Domain Name Wire

Syndicate content Domain Name Wire | Domain Name News & Website Stuff
Domain Name Industry News and Website Stuff
Updated: 3 hours 35 min ago

.Best top level domain sold to entrepreneur who wants to make it a cryptocurrency play

Thu, 2018-07-19 18:49

Adding crypto to a new TLD? Why not.

PeopleBrowsr has sold the top level domain name .best to The Best SAS, a Paris based company led by Cyril Fremont.

According to a release, .best will become “a core component of a core component of a decentralized search optimized social network, where participants will be rewarded with .Best cryptocurrency for reviewing best in class products and services.:

“We are giving the consumer their own domain name, an integrated website where they own the data, and rewards for their contribution to the community. Platforms like ours continue to move negotiating power between reviewers and sellers,” said Cyril Fremont.

It seems that the goal is to have people review products on .best domain names and reward them with the company’s cryptocurrency.

The Best SAS is owned in part by PREMLEAD, an online marketing company creates leads using a network of over 50,000 websites.

I’ll give this idea points for innovation, something that has mostly been lacking when it comes to new top level domain names.

PeopleBrowsr also runs the .CEO domain name and the “dot brand” domain .kred. None of its top level domains have proven successful, with both .CEO and .Best having about 2,500 names in their zone files.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. .CEO marketing goes from silly to…
  2. This week’s new TLDs: .Golf, .Gold and .Date
  3. .Boston domain names enter general availability today
Categories: News and Updates

ICANN Working Group: Registrants Must Retain the Right to Defend Their Domains in Court

Thu, 2018-07-19 16:58

In this post, the Internet Commerce Association provides an update on a plan to give IGOs special privileges related to domain names.

Should domain name registrants’ fundamental right, the right to go to court to overrule a UDRP decision transferring their domain name, be taken away? That was one of the primary questions that an ICANN Working Group was mandated to answer. The confusingly named ICANN IGO-INGO Access to Curative Rights Protection Mechanisms (the “Working Group”) has been examining and reviewing this issue since 2013 and just issued its Final Report.

ICANN had been considering creating a new dispute resolution system, just for Intergovernmental Organizations (IGO’s) such as the World Trade Organization (WTO), the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), and the World Customs Organization, and also for International Non-governmental Organizations (INGO’s), such as Good Neighbours International (GNI), CARE, and World Wide Fund for Nature (WWFN). These organizations and many others who use acronyms and common words in their names, would be interested in any new system that would allow them to take away corresponding domain names from registrants. Some IGOs believed that they should have first right to domains that matched their acronym, even in .com, such as to the domain WHO.com.

The Working Group was presented with, as one option, a new dispute resolution system that would be “final”, without recourse by a registrant to go to court to overturn an unfair decision. Although such a proposal has been previously raised and rejected, the Government Advisory Committee (GAC), pushed hard for it to be reconsidered. IGOs in particular argued that they currently enjoy immunity from going to court for most kinds of disputes, and wanted that immunity extended to domain name disputes. Their rationale was that as intergovernmental organizations, their immunity from being subjected to courts of any particular nation was imperative, and the UDRP as currently enacted requires all complainants to submit to a court’s jurisdiction for any dispute challenging a UDRP transfer order. Accordingly, IGOs claimed that they could not effectively use the UDRP as it would require them to waive their immunity.

It was pointed out to them, however, that they can and should be able to bring a UDRP via an agent or licensee, rather than directly themselves, in order to avoid having to submit to a court’s jurisdiction, and as such, the UDRP was perfectly equipped to handle a dispute involving an IGO.

The prospect of a new UDRP specifically for IGOs, which would enable them to target acronym domains and/or single word domains, without the right of appeal to the courts, was very concerning to domain registrants. The ICA engaged in the Working Group reviewing the IGO UDRP proposal since 2013, first represented by former ICA General Counsel, Phil Corwin, who also served as a neutral co-Chair, and then recently by Zak Muscovitch, current General Counsel. Also participating and providing long-term support to the Working Group, were ICA Board members, Nat Cohen and Jay Chapman.

Due in large part to the ICA efforts, and due also to fierce advocacy from George Kirikos, a non-ICA member of the Working Group, the Consensus recommendation of the Working Group was not to create any new system for IGOs and INGOs which would take away a registrant’s right to go to court. The ICA is pleased that the Working Group reached Consensus on this issue, amongst several other important issues, including inter alia:

a) that no substantive changes to the UDRP or URS are to be made, and no new dispute resolution procedures are to be created, for INGOs;

b) that IGOs can avail themselves of the UDRP and URS by way of filing a Complaint through an agent or licensee so as to not have to submit to jurisdiction of courts;

c) that no subsidies are to be provided to IGOs or INGOs; and

d) when a domain owner challenges a UDRP or URS decision in court and an IGO responds by successfully asserting to the court that it is immune from any court proceedings and thereby avoids having the UDRP or URS decision challenged under national law, that the original UDRP or URS will be set aside, so that registrant’s right to judicial review is not taken away.

While the final decision is up to the GNSO council, it is hoped and expected that GNSO will adopt the Consensus recommendations of its Working Group who has carefully studied the issues for years.

It is just this kind of sustained, multi-year effort to engage in ICANN’s policy making process that is required to protect registrants and the domain industry from damaging policies that are continually proposed at ICANN. The ICA is the only association that engaged in this process to protect the interests of registrants and the domain name investment industry. The ICA wishes to acknowledge and thank the Working Group’s Chair, Petter Rindforth, and the Working Group’s former Chair, Phil Corwin (formerly ICA General Counsel), for their longstanding dedication to Working Group and its efforts to review and develop policy on this important subject matter. The ICA wishes to also thank ICANN staff, Mary Wong and Steve Chan, for their longstanding support of the Working Group, as well as Susan Kawaguchi who has served as GNSO liaison to the Working Group. The ICA wishes to extend its particular gratitude to its General Counsel, Zak Muscovitch, as well as ICA Board Members Nat Cohen and Jay Chapman, who each have admirably and extensively participated in and contributed to the WG’s achievements.

The ICA will continue to vigorously represent domain name registrants and protect their rights, including the right to go to court to overturn an errant URS or UDRP decision. When the UDRP was originally established in 1999, there was a “grand bargain” wherein trademark owners would be able to avail themselves of a streamlined and low-cost dispute resolution system for clear cut cases of abusive domain name registrations, but domain name owners would not have to give up their right to go to a national court in order to overturn a wrongly decided UDRP case. Over the years, we have seen the UDRP successfully adjudicate thousands of clear cut cases. But we have also, with unfortunate regularity, seen the UDRP abused by trademark owners and errant panelists, to take away lawfully and fairly registered domain names. Concerningly, instances of Reverse Domain Name Hijacking against registrants is on the rise. These valid concerns exist irrespective of whether the registrant’s ownership of its domain is challenged by a trademark owner or an IGO. Under such circumstances, the registrant’s fundamental right to go to court must be protected.

Zak Muscovitch is General Counsel to the Internet Commerce Association, a group that advocates on behalf of domain name investors.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. ICA Asks ICANN to Halt Expedited Domain Arbitration Plans
  2. ICA issues statement on horrible Camilla.com UDRP decision
  3. UDRP reform is coming. Here’s ICA’s position
Categories: News and Updates

Building a site on Squarespace

Thu, 2018-07-19 15:31

Hopefully you read my overview of sitebuilders including Wix, Weebly and Squarespace. In today’s post, I’m going to explain how I built a site on Squarespace.

(I want to be clear up front that I’m not ranking the site builders. I built different types of sites on each service, and my goal is to explain how the process worked for me.)

I used a newly-registered domain name for my site: Bartending.school. It was a premium domain name, but the $220-a-year price tag seemed reasonable given the high search volumes for bartending school topics.

Like the other site builders, Squarespace didn’t ask me about a domain name before I got started. Instead, I selected a template and started building the site. It wasn’t until I was ready to publish that I had to select my domain and pay for anything.

Building

I selected a template and started building out my site. Overall, Squarespace was extremely easy to learn and use. There were a couple of site design procedures that confused me a bit, such as editing the top menu and the sections of the website. In one instance, I couldn’t figure out how to exit out of a screen and ended up hitting the back button. But Squarespace has good help pages that walked me through the few hurdles I faced.

I particularly like the ease of making sitewide changes to fonts and text sizes through the style editor.

Change text size, color and font sitewide through the Style Editor.

My site takes advantage of regular pages as well as blog pages. Squarespace’s built-in blog system has few of the bells and whistles you get with WordPress. But, keeping with the simplicity, it’s easy to use.

The Squarespace blog editor.

Blog pages are also compatible with AMP, which could help you get more traffic for Google.

While Wix has “apps” that can be plugged into your site similar to what Shopify offers, all of Squarespace’s apps (called integrations) are available by default. You can see them here.

I spent quite a bit of time building the site because I drafted all of the content from scratch. But once I got the hang of Squarespace, adding new content was very easy.

 

Packages

Squarespace makes you pay before you can publish (some competitors let you published a branded-site on a subdomain without paying).

Here’s the pricing for regular (not e-commerce) websites:

Personal Plan – $16 a month or $144 a year.
Business Plan – $26 a month or $216 a year.

The business plan adds additional features including the ability to add some customized code to your header and in the site. It also comes with some ecommerce capabilities, although for those you might want to opt for one of the dedicated e-commerce packages.

The customized code injection and code blocks in the business plan will be necessary if you want to add third-party javascript widgets such as Adsense. But, as with all of these site builders, you can’t edit code line-by-line.

It’s worth noting that Squarespace doesn’t offer email. Instead, it has a partnership with Google to offer G Suite’s basic plan. This is typical for site builders.

After selecting a plan, I connected my domain bartending.school to the website by adding DNS records at my domain registrars. A free domain comes with all annual packages. (Of course, not a premium one like bartending.school.)

Publishing and Promoting

Once your site is built, any changes you make to the site will instantly be published when you save them.

Squarespace integrates directly with Google Search Console. Once your site is built you can click a few buttons to add it to Search Console. Your sitemap will automatically be submitted as well.

Once nice feature is that you can access much of your Search Console data from directly within the Analytics section of Squarespace.

Overall

I am very impressed by Squarespace. Just looking at my site, It’s much more professional looking that something I could have created in the same amount of time with WordPress. I can see why a small business would opt to use Squarespace as opposed to WordPress.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Squarespace starts offering domain name registration
  2. Testing out the website builders: Wix, Weebly and Squarespace
Categories: News and Updates

Win free tickets to Merge

Wed, 2018-07-18 20:15

Want to go to MERGE! in September? Here are some free tickets.

The second annual MERGE! show takes place September 14-19 in Orlando at the Disney Springs Hilton.

Fabulous is sponsoring the hospitality suite this year, and as part of its sponsorship, it has some free tickets to giveaway. I’m helping them give away four of these tickets to DNW readers. Tickets currently cost $499.

You have to do a little bit of sleuthing to win.

To win, you need to be the first person to correctly answer any of the questions below by posting a comment. Only the first person to answer the question wins.

To be clear, there are four tickets and four questions. You win by answering one of them correctly, but you need to be the first person to answer that question correctly.

If you know you can’t go to the conference or already have a ticket, please don’t answer the questions. Also, please only answer one of the questions (unless you find out you answered one incorrectly).

Ready? Here are the questions:

X Which DNW Podcast guest is a Grammy Award winner? ANSWERED: David Ellefson of Megadeth

X What year did Fabulous launch? ANSWERED: 2002

X Which DNW Podcast guest was involved with domain names from the earliest date? ANSWERED: Paul Mockapetris, inventor of the DNS

X What extremely valuable domain names that was previously under management at Fabulous.com sold to Amazon this year? ANSWERED: Prime.com

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Survey: Sedo Top Domain Name Parking Service
  2. Dark Blue Sea Profit Down 80%
  3. Two domain(ish) conferences added to 2017 calendar
Categories: News and Updates

Testing out the website builders: Wix, Weebly and Squarespace

Wed, 2018-07-18 16:09

In the coming days I will review my experience building sites with several popular website builders.

The way in which small businesses get online has changed. It used to be that everyone searched for a domain name as a starting point. Once they registered a domain, they’d build a website.

A handful of web presence companies have turned that model on its head. Wix, Squarespace and Weebly take a site-first approach. They help customers design a website and then link them to a domain name later.

The model is working.

Wix is publicly traded on the Nasdaq (WIX) and has a market cap of nearly $5 billion. In May it reported Q1 revenue of $137.8 million, up 49% year-over-year. It had 3.4 million paying customers at the end of Q1.

There’s not much public data available about Weebly and Squarespace. There will soon be more data about Weebly because it was acquired by publicly-traded Square (NASDAQ: SQ) earlier this year for $365 million.

It’s clear that people are gravitating toward these company’s site-first onramps.

In many ways, it’s not a battle of domain name registrars like GoDaddy (which mostly focus on the domain as the starting point) vs. the site builders. Instead, it’s a battle of WordPress vs. the site builders.

Over the past month or so I’ve tested each of these company’s site builders by building a site on them. I’ve reflected on the experience compared to creating sites on WordPress–something I’ve done since 2005. Here are the advantages of the site builders:

1. Easy to start – it’s incredibly easy to start creating a site on one of the site builders. In some cases, you can proceed with multiple steps before even registering.

2. Easy to design – designing a site on WordPress usually requires installing a third-party theme or framework. This is too technical for most people creating a website. The site builders give themes to choose from as a start point. More importantly, everything is drag-and-drop and WYSIWYG. It’s dead simple. (The WordPress onramp at many registrars is improving, and I’ll write about that as well.)

3. Security and peace of mind – The site builders take care of upkeep and maintenance. WordPress users are used to getting hacked. There are tools they can use to limit these chances. But with the site builders, the security is built in and invisible. Business owners don’t even need to think about it. (The hosted WordPress.com takes care of much of this too, and could be considered a site builder like the Wix, Squarespace and Weebly.)

These benefits come with drawbacks.

1. Very limited customization – True, you can drag and drop your content just about anywhere. But the site builders are walled gardens. Want to install a third-party widget on a Wix site? You better hope it has been built into a Wix app.  You can customize WordPress however you want; the same can’t be said for the site builders.

2. Lock-in – The site builders are designed to lock you in. If you’re on WordPress you can easily switch webhosts. Switching from a site builder that provides both the CMS and the hosting is much harder. Squarespace offers limited exporting if you want to move to WordPress. So does Weebly. Wix does not, although there are third-party tools for doing this.

In my following posts, I’ll explain how I built sites with the three big site builders.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Northwest Austin is marketing Weebly like crazy
  2. Here are the domain and website biz’s 2 Super Bowl commercials
  3. Square to buy Weebly for $365 million
Categories: News and Updates

20 end user domain name sales up to $55,000

Wed, 2018-07-18 14:14

A cryptocurrency exchange, clothing designer and customized apparel company bought domain names.

Blockchain and cryptocurrency companies continue to buy domain names, and this week’s chart-leader at Sedo was BTCExchange.com for $55,000.

This was one of 20 end user sales I uncovered by reviewing Sedo’s weekly list of sales over $2,000.

Also notable is that a .co.uk domain sold for £22,500–a high amount for a .co.uk–but the buyer isn’t known yet.

Here are the end user domain name sales I uncovered in Sedo’s list this week.

(You can view previous lists like this here.)

BTCExchange.com $55,000 – Someone in Romania bought this domain name for cryptocurrency site. BTC is the ‘symbol’ for bitcoin.

Park.co.uk £22,500 – The buyer has a fun coming soon page, but their identity isn’t yet known.

LauraGarcia.com $11,000 – Clothing designer Laura Garcia had been using the domain name LauraGarciaCollection.com. She also uses an email address ending in .nyc.

Qness.com €10,000 – Qness does hardness testing of materials. It uses the domain name Qness.at.

TomorrowIsYou.com $8,500 – A CSC client bought this domain name.

GBLife.com £7,500 – Global Bankers Insurance Group in North Carolina.

Digitique.com €5,500 – AV company HUB Telluride in Colorado rebranded as Digitiqe. Note the spelling difference here; the company name definitely failed the radio test.

StormAid.com $5,500 – The buyer runs several companies including OneName Global and Eclipse Solutions. I’m not sure what the domain is for.

Mufan.com $5,000 – Chengdu Mufan Technology Co., Ltd., which uses the domain name Mufan.io, acquired the matching .com domain.

JoyLabs.com $3,950 – The owner isn’t known yet but a coming soon page states “We are working very hard to push the boundaries of computer science and happiness.”

VOIPAdvisor.com $3,499 – The buyer is creating “The site for VOIP best practice advice and resources from industry experts.”

LovedBy.com £3,000 – Loved By Ltd in London plans to launch on August 18.

AHO.org $3,000 – Africa Health Organisation, or AHO, bought the acronym of its organization in .org.

DigitalPioneers.org $2,788 – CODE Education GmbH is a private university in Berlin. A slogan on its website is “A new kind of university for the Digital Pioneers of tomorrow”. It uses the domain code.berlin.

Trusty.de €2,700 – The buyer owns Trusty.ag. A Google translation of its site states: “TRUSTY creates digital identities that are transparently evaluated, certified and protected, and serves to cumulate and trade the most valuable and scarce commodities: Trust and capacity.” I’m not sure what they do.

Spreadshirt.org $2,500 – Spreadshirt sells customized shirts and other apparel. It also owns the matching .com and .net. This company previously bought TeamShirts.com for $89,000 and TeamShirt.com for $23,000.

KidzKare.com $2,500 – Kidz Kare is a childcare company that uses the domain name KidzKare.ca.

Martesana.com €2,200 – Martesana srl owns the Italian country code domain name martesanasrl.it

TeaBags.com $2,150 – The domain now forwards to chaitea.com. Is this a shockingly low price or is it just me?

Pro-Mining.com $2,000 – ProMiner is a cryptocurrency mining company.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. From bitcoin to mortgages, here are 17 end user domain sales
  2. What domain names Goldman Sachs and others bought this week
  3. More end user domain name sales
Categories: News and Updates

What Internet Commerce Association is working on

Tue, 2018-07-17 16:33

Internet Commerce Association updates members on some of the policy work it is doing.

Last week the Internet Commerce Association (ICA) held a member call to provide an update on what the organization is doing to advocate for domain name investors.

Here are just some of the things ICA is working on:

  • UDRP and UDRP reform
  • Whois access accreditation and accessibility in the wake of GDPR
  • Verisign’s request to auction off O.com and how it might set precedent
  • U.S. NTIA activities as they relate to domain names, such as the Cooperative Agreement with Verisign

ICA is also representing domain name investors at policy conferences including all of the ICANN meetings.

In addition to policy activities, the group discussed its budget. It’s a lean operation with a very low annual budget. With more domain investor support, the organization could commit more resources to fight on behalf of domain name investors.

You can see membership options here. They include everything from a $50-a-month individual option to corporate levels. And if you’d prefer to pay for a larger sponsorship in cryptocurrency, I bet they’ll accommodate you.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Now is the time to join ICA
Categories: News and Updates

Ice.com, a domain with a rich history, sells again. This time for $3.5 million.

Tue, 2018-07-17 15:30

Once a dot-com darling, the Ice.com domain name finds a new owner.

Ice.com circa 2004, from Archive.org Wayback Machine

Today’s announced sale of the Ice.com domain name for $3.5 million brings me back down memory lane.

I remember shopping on the site in the early 2000s.

That was in a much earlier incarnation of Ice.com. It was a dot-com darling founded in 1999 (launching in 2000 on Ice.com) that raised about $50 million in funding.

Back in 2006, Ice.com bought rival Odimo for $9.5 million. That included $2 million for inventory at $7.5 million for its domain name Diamond.com — making it one of the most expensive domain names ever sold.

But Ice.com ultimately didn’t make it.

An Austin-based company bought Ice.com for $3.0 million in 2014. They subsequently raised $2 million of investment.

That business didn’t work out, either, which leads us to today: an announcement that the domain sold for $3.5 million, making it the most expensive domain name sale of 2018 in what’s shaping up to be a very big week for domain name sales announcements.

Brian Harbin from GritBrokerage.com and David Clements from Brannans.com represented the seller and buyer respectively.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. $2.6 Million Social.com Sale Could Make Moniker Auction a Big One
  2. Why Envelopes.com acquired two more category-defining domain names
  3. Fashion.nyc domain name sells for $37,000, Shop.nyc sells for $33,500
Categories: News and Updates

CentralNic scoops up KeyDrive for up to $55 million

Mon, 2018-07-16 18:07

Deal includes cash and share consideration with earnout that could make it a $55 million total price tag.

CentralNic (AIM: CNIC) announced today that it has agreed to acquire KeyDrive S.A. for up to $55 million.

The deal includes initial consideration of $35.8 million, made up of $16.5 million in cas and the rest in shares of CentralNic. That equals an enterprise value of $44.5 million after considering debt and other assumptions.

An additional $10.5 million will be paid as an earnout, with at least 15% of that in cash.

KeyDrive is the parent company of Key-Systems, Moniker, BrandShelter and other domain name brands. In the 2017 financial year, it grossed $58.26 million and had an adjusted EBITDA of $5.87 million.

CentralNic is a registry services provider and owns retail registrars including Instra and Internet.bs.

Merger talks started no later than the first quarter of this year.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. CentralNic buys domain name registrar Internet.bs (IBS)
  2. CentralNic and KeyDrive look to merge
  3. CentralNic reports 2017 earnings, merger with KeyDrive still in the works
Categories: News and Updates

17 end user sales up to $130,000

Mon, 2018-07-16 17:22

Some recognizable companies bought domain names at Sedo.

One of the enjoyable things about researching domain name sales is that I learn about interesting industries, foreign language terms, and fun entrepreneurial ventures. This week, for example, I learned that Sekt is the name for German sparkling wine.

Notable this week: Bosch bought a two-hyphen domain name for €12,500 as part of an eBike marketing campaign, a maker of fine quality jigsaw puzzles bought a .co.uk domain, and a special effects company bought a clever three word domain.

Here’s a list of some of the end user domain name sales that took place at Sedo over the past week.

NBX.com $130,000 – The buyer is unknown, but I’m going to assume it’s a crypto company.

Sekt.com €22,500 – Sekt is German sparking wine and the buyer, Henkell & Co. Sektkellerei KG, is a seller of sekt and other alcohol.

Feel-the-flow.de €12,500 – Bosch bought this domain, and it forwards to a page about its eBikes.

TWCapital.com $10,000 – TW Capital Co., Ltd. in Bangkok.

PhoneCovers.com $5,600 – Tech Master IT Services in the UK is a computer repair company.

Verified.io $5,000 – The eSignature company Verified which uses the domain name Verified.eu.

Lahcg.com $4,880 – LHC Group is a healthcare company based in Lafayette, Louisiana. Its current domain name is LHCGroup.com. Maybe the A stands for “and”?

Net4Energy.com $4,880 – The domain forwards to the website for Creos Deutschland Services GmbH, which offers energy-related services.

Totectors.com $3,500 – International Brands Group sells shoes under a number of different brands. I suspect this will be for a new brand or product feature name.

Cryptocraft.org $3,500 – Forex Factory in Florida.

ThinkFun.co.uk $3,000 – Ravensburger AG makes toys and games. It’s known for making high-quality jigsaw puzzles.

HarmonyFoundation.com $3,000 – Harmony Foundation is an alcohol and drug rehabilitation center. It uses the domain name HarmonyFoundationInc.com.

Bident.com $2,749 – Bident Services, LLC in California.

BloodAndThunder.com $2,500 – Legacy Effects is a Hollywood move effects and makeup company. I love the name for this. (Don’t visit the page yet. It goes to a scam zero click lander.

Osano.com $2,256 – Osano is a stealth-mode company in Austin that “builds products which are venture backable, scalable, and have a minimum potential of a $100M market cap.”

Matrix.info £2,000 – Matrix Financial Services in Hong Kong.

Visas.fr €2,000 – Visas is being developed as a tourism site.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. What domain names Mozilla and others bought last week
  2. What domain names Goldman Sachs and others bought this week
  3. More end user domain name sales
Categories: News and Updates

Why ConvertKit rebranded as Seva – DNW Podcast #194

Mon, 2018-07-16 15:30

ConvertKit’s founder discusses the long journey to rebranding as Seva.

ConvertKit has become a successful email marketing platform with $1 million a month in recurring revenue. But it became apparent to founder Nathan Barry and his team that the company needed to rebrand. On today’s show, Nathan discusses the two-year journey of renaming the company, including the intense negotiations to buy Seva.com. It’s a great entrepreneurial story and a great domain name story wrapped into one.

Also: Payoneer quits the escrow business, DomainTools sued and happy birthday Google Adsense.

Subscribe via iTunes to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, view on Google Play Music, or click play below or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Ray King on Marketing Domain Names – DNW Podcast #99
  2. Chris Sheridan – DNW Podcast #115
  3. Frank Schilling explains price hike – DNW Podcast #127
Categories: News and Updates

Goldman Sachs’ Marcus brand gets ready to launch credit card

Sat, 2018-07-14 13:34

Domain names related to new credit card are registered at brand protection domain name registrar.

Goldman Sachs’ Marcus consumer financial products brand appears to be getting ready to launch a credit card.

Late last year (or early this year) it acquired a credit card startup. As of today, the company still hasn’t launched a consumer credit card.

But plans for a credit card appear to be shifting into high gear. In recent days a company has registered many domain names related to a Marcus credit card.

Oddly, the domains have been registered with Whois privacy at Mark Monitor. Mark Monitor is a brand protection registrar and customers don’t squat on other company’s brands there. But Goldman Sach’s main domain names are registered with rival brand protection registrar CSC.

Intriguingly, for one day the domain name gsmarcuscard.com was registered to Black Card, LLC before the Whois record was updated to Whois privacy. Black Card LLC offers a premium credit card issued by Barclays Bank Delaware.

It’s possible we’re looking at a partnership here.

Here are the domains registered in the past few days:

marcuscardconcierge.com
marcuscardexperiences.com
marcuscardrewards.com
marcuscardtravel.com
marcuscardvip.com
mymarcuscard.com
mymarcuscardrewards.com
gsmarcuscard.com
marcusblackcard.com
marcusdiamondcard.com
marcusgoldcard.com
marcusluxurycard.com
marcusluxurycardblack.com
marcusluxurycardconcierge.com
marcusluxurycardexperiences.com
marcusluxurycardgold.com
marcusluxurycardmagazine.com
marcusluxurycardrewards.com
marcusluxurycardtitanium.com
marcusluxurycardtravel.com
marcusmagazine.com
marcustitanium.com
marcustitaniumcard.com
marcustuition.com
marcustuitioncard.com
mymarcusblack.com
mymarcusblackcard.com
mymarcusdiamondcard.com
mymarcusgold.com
mymarcusgoldcard.com
mymarcusluxurycard.com
mymarcustitanium.com
mymarcustitaniumcard.com
mymarcustuitioncard.com

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

No related posts.

Categories: News and Updates

ILQ Australia Pty Ltd is a reverse domain name hijacker

Sat, 2018-07-14 13:11

Company filed cybersquatting complaint against FairMarkets.com after failing to buy domain name from its rightful owner.

A financial products company called ILQ Australia Pty Ltd has been found guilty of reverse domain name hijacking over the domain name FairMarkets.com. The company is also associated with BrokerMate Pty Ltd.

It filed the UDRP against a financial expert who acquired the domain name for $3,788 in 2014. That’s prior to when the complainant claims trademark rights. Based on the decision, it appears that the complainant has recent aspirations to use the term “Fair Markets”. It has registered a couple of alternative domain names such as fair.markets and fairmarkets.com.au. At the time of the filing, neither were in use. The company recently launched a site on Fair.markets. In any event, its claimed trademark rights post-date the registration of the domain.

The panel found ILQ Australia failed to prove any of the three elements of the UDRP.

It is a fairly classic “Plan B” reverse domain name hijacking. The complainant tried to buy the domain name. After escalating its offer and failing to strike a deal, it filed a cybersquatting complaint.

Debrett G. Lyons was the panelist for National Arbitration Forum. ILQ was represented by James O’Neill. LinkedIn shows that he’s the Chief Compliance Officer for the company.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Mirabella Beauty Products Guilty of Reverse Domain Name Hijacking
  2. Dubai Law Firm Nailed for Reverse Domain Name Hijacking
  3. Minnesota Company Guilty of Reverse Domain Name Hijacking
Categories: News and Updates

Compare Ninja Ltd. makes egregious reverse domain name hijacking attempt

Fri, 2018-07-13 16:30

Company files baseless cybersquatting claim after failing to buy domain name.

Compare Ninja Ltd., which operates the site ticket-compare.com, has been found to have engaged in reverse domain name hijacking for the domain name TicketCompare.com.

The company filed a cybersquatting complaint against the domain name with World Intellectual Property Organization.

Ticketcompare.com was registered well before the company started using ticket-compare.com, which would explain its choice of a hyphenated domain name.

It first tried to buy the domain name but didn’t like the asking price. Over a year later it sent cease & desist letters to the domain owner. When the domain owner didn’t respond, it filed a UDRP.

Compare Ninja Ltd failed on all three elements required to win a UDRP.

In finding reverse domain name hijacking, the three-member World Intellectual Property Organization panel wrote:

The Complainant’s conduct follows the well-travelled route of a successive three-pronged attempt to gain control of a domain name, usually a “.com” domain name, upon which the relevant complainant simply has no possible claim.

Compare Ninja’s lawyer, Assaf Cohen Sidon, claims on his LinkedIn page to specialize in internet and intellectual property law.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Major.com UDRP denied, but no RDNH
  2. WIPO responds to ICA’s UDRP Platform
  3. UDRP after GDPR: challenges without Whois
Categories: News and Updates

ICANN puts .Pharmacy operator National Association of Board of Pharmacy on notice

Fri, 2018-07-13 14:59

Group must cure two breaches or face termination of its right to operate the .Pharmacy top level domain.

ICANN has sent a breach notice (pdf) to .pharmacy top level domain operator National Association of Board of Pharmacy.

The breach notice is the result of the Public Interest Commitment Dispute Resolution Procedure (PICDRP). Canadawide Pharmacy Ltd filed the dispute after being denied the registration of the canadawidepharmacy.pharmacy domain name.

The registration was denied, in part, based on Canadawide allegedly having been associated with some pharmacies that sent drugs to locations in which they weren’t licensed.

But the PICDRP panel noted that the .Pharmacy operator didn’t provide evidence of this link to the other pharmacies, and that it appears that Canadawide is no longer affiliated with those pharmacies.

The breach notice cites National Association of Board of Pharmacy for

NABP’s failure to operate the top-level domain (“TLD”) pharmacy in a transparent manner consistent with general principles of openness and non-discrimination by establishing, publishing and adhering to clear registration policies, as required by Section 3.c. of Specification 11 of the RA.

and

NABP’s failure to publish on its website a primary contact for handling inquiries related to malicious conduct in the TLD feedback, as required by Section 4.1 of Specification 6 of the RA.

The registry operator has until August 11 to comply or ICANN may commence a termination process.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

No related posts.

Categories: News and Updates

New Zealand’s .NZ administrator sues DomainTools

Thu, 2018-07-12 16:14

Country code administrator says that DomainTools is violating its Whois Terms of Use.

Domain Name Commission Limited (DNCL), the group that oversees New Zealand’s .nz country code domain namespace, has sued (large pdf) DomainTools over its collection of .nz Whois records.

The company claims that DomainTools’ bulk collection of .nz Whois records violates its terms of use. Its Whois terms were updated in 2016 to explicitly prohibit publishing historical versions of Whois data. The terms also prohibit sending “high volume WHOIS queries with the effect of downloading part of or all of the .nz Register or collecting register data or records”.

It’s the publication of historical data that seems to have drawn the ire of DNCL. It recently added an Individual Registrant Privacy Option (“IRPO”) to allow some .nz registrants to keep their information private. But their historical information is available at DomainTools even once they add privacy.

DNCL reached out to DomainTools last year in an effort to resolve the issue, but it wasn’t happy with the progress it was making. It filed the lawsuit last month and is requesting a preliminary injunction against DomainTools.

The lawsuit comes at a bad time for DomainTools. It is currently coping with the fallout of GDPR, which has restricted the company’s access to Whois records across most top level domain names overseen by ICANN.

A representative of DomainTools declined to comment due to the ongoing litigation.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. DomainTools is about to get more expensive for some users
  2. DomainTools retools website
  3. Donuts appoints outside director, new CFO
Categories: News and Updates

Competition in the domain industry

Thu, 2018-07-12 14:49

Some parts of the domain name business lack competition.

Let’s talk about competition.

Competition and choice are good for consumers.

An example of a competitive market is that of domain name registration. There are hundreds of domain registrars competing for your business. That’s why domain registration prices remain fairly low, registrars create new products and services, and the cost of value-added services remain low (or even free).

A great example of a non-competitive market is for internet service. In the U.S., most people have a choice between just two wired broadband companies. It’s usually a cable company and a telco.

You don’t hear many people say they love their internet service provider. These companies have little incentive to compete on price and service since the alternative is just as bad.

We have some non-competitive markets in the domain name business, and we have seen the effects of this first hand.

There were a lot of reasons that revenue from domain parking plummeted. One of these is because there were really one two companies providing ads for parked pages.

Yes, there were lots of parking companies. They competed intensely for your business. But these were middlemen.

At the wholesale level, it was always just Yahoo! and Google. Much like internet providers, this duopoly was able to start turning the screws. Then, when Yahoo basically disappeared from the scene, Google was able to do whatever it wanted: change policies, reduce payouts…you name it.

While we have lots of competition with domain registrars, we are still quite limited when it comes to domain investor service providers. Thankfully, it’s not the internet provider situation in which they are taking full advantage of their situation. But it could become that way.

Earlier this week Payoneer announced it was leaving the escrow business. I doubt Payoneer ever ran huge volumes of domain escrow transactions, but it played a key role in keeping Escrow.com on its toes. Domain traders had a viable alternative for escrow with a big brand.

I don’t think Payoneer’s exit will have a huge impact on escrow. After all, Escrow.com has been doing whatever it can to try to win customers who had issues with its know-your-customer procedures. Even before Payoneer came on the scene, it kept prices in check. There are always alternatives like lawyers to handle escrow.

But look at some other types of services.

One that concerns me greatly is the domain aftermarket. There are basically two big marketplaces: Sedo and Afternic. Marketplaces are difficult to create, and it will be hard for anyone to challenge these companies.

Each of the companies has its own strengths and weaknesses. But it’s important that both remain strong. If one flounders, the other could easily raise its commissions. For that reason, I hope that registrars partner with both Sedo and Afternic, not just one of them.

Although they aren’t marketplaces, I’m also excited to see services like Efty and Uniregistry out there that can at least compete on generating leads from landing pages.

The expired domain market also concerns me. Generally speaking, there have always just been two players for the direct-transfer expiry market. Right now those two players are GoDaddy and NameJet.

GoDaddy has innovated a lot in this area. As a result, it has won over a lot of the business that used to go to NameJet. GoDaddy deserves to get this business based on its innovation. Let’s face it, NameJet hasn’t done much to invest in its platform and compete.

But if all registrars decide to send their expired inventory to GoDaddy, then NameJet will die and Godaddy will get to dictate the terms to play in the market. This includes the terms for domain registrar partners as well as bidders.

There are always winners and losers, and the best companies should win the business. As consumers, though, we need to encourage healthy competition.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Survey: Escrow.com Tops for Big Ticket Domain Name Transactions
  2. Sedo Improves Security of Escrow Process
  3. Survey: Sedo Top Online Domain Sales Site
Categories: News and Updates

15 years of Google Adsense

Wed, 2018-07-11 16:17

I started using Adsense 15 years ago.

Google Adsense is 15 years old. Today Google sent an email to me with a bit of personal data:

I remember the great excitement I had when Adsense first came out. Finally, owners of niche content sites had a way to earn good money from relevant ads.

The best month–January, 20106–was bittersweet. At one point I was earning over $1,000 a day. Then I got a message from Google that some of my sites weren’t up to their quality guidelines, and the revenue dropped significantly overnight.

I still use Adsense on smaller sites for which it doesn’t make sense to do direct ad sales. But the glory days of January 2016 are long gone.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Google Now Targeting Ads to Users, Not Just Content
  2. Adsense as a Platform and What it Means for Publishers
  3. Domain Parking Coming to .Tel
Categories: News and Updates

Jolly.com UDRP: “Is someone trying to steal it from me?”

Wed, 2018-07-11 15:21

Woman is understandably confused that someone tried to get the domain Jolly.com through a UDRP.

A Turkish company has failed to take the domain name Jolly.com away from its owner, who was understandably confused by being on the receiving end of a UDRP.

Club Jolly Turizm ve Ticaret A.Ş. filed the complaint against Jon B. Jolly, Inc., a company that appears to be owned by a Seattle man named Jon Jolly. The complaint was responded to by Mary Ruth Jolly. The domain appears to have been owned since February 1997, before the complainant had trademark rights in the term “Jolly”.

In response to the UDRP filing, Mary Ruth Jolly wrote:

I do not understand what is happening with my domain Jolly.com Nothing has been changed or should be changed. Is someone trying to steal it from me?

Well, that might be a fair analysis of the situation.

The World Intellectual Property Organization panel found for the domain owner on the issues of rights/legitimate interests in the domain name as well as if the domain was registered in bad faith.

While panelist Dr. Clive N.A. Trotman made the right decision, it would have been nice if he’d considered reverse domain name hijacking.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. BlackBerry Wins 101 Domain Names in Single UDRP Case
  2. ScotiaBank Loses Case for Caribana Festival Domain Name
  3. Insurance company Allianz tries reverse domain name hijacking a domain name
Categories: News and Updates

Frank Schilling successfully defends OceanBreeze.com domain in UDRP

Wed, 2018-07-11 13:01

Company filed cybersquatting claim after failing to buy domain.

JC Global wanted the domain name OceanBreeze.com for its line of air conditioners…but didn’t want to pay the asking price.

Frank Schilling, with the help of attorney John Berryhill, has defended his company’s domain name OceanBreeze.com in a UDRP.

The case was filed by JC Global. That company sells air conditioners and dehumidifiers under the Ocean Breeze brand.

JC Global’s case was dead on arrival. The domain name was registered well before JC Global got a trademark for Ocean Breeze. It’s also a fairly generic domain, and the parked page for the domain showed ads related to cruises.

This was clearly a “Plan B” UDRP filing. JC Global inquired about buying the domain name but wouldn’t meet the asking price.

The National Arbitration Forum panel did not consider reverse domain name hijacking.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Schilling Beats New York Times in Landmark UDRP
  2. Frank Schilling beats $200 billion healthcare giant Novartis in UDRP
  3. Frank Schilling gets reverse domain name hijacking win on Puket.com
Categories: News and Updates

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer