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Updated: 9 hours 5 min ago

Company says using the word “collusion” in a domain is cybersquatting

12 hours 12 min ago

Another facepalm moment for law firm Stobbs IP.

A better message would be “Action required. We should review our cases before sending a C&D.”

The Electronic Frontier Foundation is representing the registrant of the domain name collusion.so after he received a threat letter from U.K. clothing company Asos.

The registrant bought the domain name after Rudy Guliani tweeted “#REALNEWS: Woodward says no evidence of collusion.So does Manafort’s team.”

Because Guliani omitted a space, twitter viewed collusion.so as a domain name and linked to it. .So is the country code for Somalia.

The domain registrant forwarded the domain to a site about possible collusion between the Trump team and Russia.

Asos launched a clothing line called Collusion late last year. Apparently, it thinks it now owns the word. It sent a cease & desist letter claiming that the owner of Collusion.so is cybersquatting.

I see lots of cease & desist letters fired off based on automated triggers without much human thought. This appears to be one of those. (At least I hope that’s the case.)

Asos is represented by Stobbs IP, a UK law firm that has the dubious honor of being on the wrong end of two reverse domain name hijacking decisions in a single day.

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Categories: News and Updates

The CloudInsure.com UDRP has a lot of open questions

Tue, 2019-01-22 19:36

I’m confused after reading this UDRP decision and reviewing the domain’s details

This morning I began writing an article about a UDRP for CloudInsure.com. My general thesis was that this should have been a case of reverse domain name hijacking. Once I started investigating, I had more questions than I had answers.

According to the National Arbitration Forum decision, CyberRiskPartners, LLC filed the case against Drew Bartkiewicz.

National Arbitration Forum Panelist M. Kelly Tillery included this timeline in the decision:

3/17/10 Domain Name First Registered
10/1/11 Complainant LLC Formed
11/14/12 Filing Date TM Application by Complainant
11/30/13 First Claimed Use of Mark by Complainant
2/3/15 Complainant TM Registration on U.S. Supplemental Register
12/17/18 Complainant Filed Complaint

I should note that the 2012 trademark filing was on an intent-to-use basis. Also, note that the registration is on the supplemental registrar.

I checked historical Whois records and verified that the current owner was the 2010 registrant.

Given these facts, this UDRP was dead on arrival; the domain owner registered the domain prior to the Complainant even existing.

But things got confusing when I went to view CyberRiskPartners’ website.

CyberRiskPartner’s website says the company is the holding company of CloudInsure.com, LLC. If you click on CloudInsure.com it forwards to CloudEnsure.org, a name that was just registered on January 8.

Additionally, the Complainant submitted marketing materials and a business card to the USPTO in 2014 that included the CloudInsure.com domain name.

And if you go back to archives of CloudInsure.com, it says it’s a subsidiary of CyberRiskPartners, LLC.

All of this would lead you to believe that the Complainant had control of the domain name at some point. But nothing in the decision alludes to this.

I reached out to both the Complainant and Respondent this morning and did not immediately hear back.

What am I missing?

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Categories: News and Updates

Radix premiums generated $1.35 million in second half of 2018

Tue, 2019-01-22 14:26

Renewals account for over half of the company’s premium revenue in H2 2018.

Radix premiums generated about $1.35 million in retail revenue during the second half of 2018.

New top level domain name company Radix had a strong finish to 2018 when it comes to premium domain name sales.

The registry estimates about $1.355 million in revenue from both recurring premium fees and one-time premium fees on its portfolio of domain names. This number considers the retail prices paid.

Renewals accounted for more than half of this. 716 premium renewals generated approximately $777k. 566 new registrations generated about $415k. The company also sold 15 domains with one-time premium fees to generate $162k.

Top sales with recurring premium fees include house.store for $16,875, water.tech for $15,000 and edu.online for $10,700.

Top sales with one-time premiums include design.online for $57,500, air.space for $17,500 and king.online for $17,250.

.Online and .Tech were top sellers. Each generated over $100,000 in retail revenue.

51% of premium domains are renewed on their first anniversary and 76% after that. 41% of renewed premium domains are being used. I’m actually surprised this number isn’t higher given the high cost to renew, but keep in mind that not all premiums have high renewal fees. For example, the average price of new premium .website registrations is only $295.

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Categories: News and Updates

Domain auction preview with Monte Cahn – DNW Podcast #220

Mon, 2019-01-21 16:30

A look back at previous live domain auctions and what to expect next week in Las Vegas.

Monte Cahn joins on us this week’s podcast to preview next week’s NamesCon live domain name auction. We also discuss what he’s seeing in the domain market and what has happened to the value of certain types of domain names.

Also: DomainTools appeals, interesting data showing registrar competitiveness, and addicting lawsuit and more.

Subscribe via iTunes to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, view on Google Play Music, or click play above or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)

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Categories: News and Updates

Prince’s estate settles Prince.com fight with Domain Capital

Sun, 2019-01-20 15:49

Redacted settlement gives hint that estate will get domain as part of the settlement.

The Estate of Prince Rogers Nelson has settled a legal battle with Domain Capital over ownership of the Prince.com domain name.

The estate sued Domain Capital saying that it was cybersquatting by owning Prince.com. Domain Capital countersued for reverse domain name hijacking and requested that the Prince trademark be canceled.

On June 11, the estate filed a planned settlement agreement in the probate court in Carver County, Minnesota. It’s heavily redacted and does not publicly display terms of the agreement. However, it mentions that there’s an escrow agreement involved. This suggests that the likely outcome is Domain Capital will transfer the domain to the estate and drop its counterclaims in return for a cash settlement.

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Categories: News and Updates

How a Whois check could have halted a scam

Fri, 2019-01-18 19:52

Victims failed to notice the registration date of the domain name used to initiate the scam.

Note the recent creation date on this domain used in a scam.

A Wendi Deng Murdoch imposter tricked photographers into paying for flights to and photography permits in Indonesia, and a more thorough Whois lookup could have saved the victims from losing money and time.

CNN reports about the scam that duped photographers Henry Wu and Carley Rudd. I must say, it’s much more elaborate than most scams that land in your inbox. It was well-researched and thought out.

The photographers were tricked into flying to Indonesia and buying photography permits for a gig. They later found out it was a scam and pointed out that they overlooked something obvious. The emails they received were from the domain wendimurdoch.com. That led credibility to the scam, but it turns out the domain was registered only recently:

Wu told CNN, “we overlooked the red flags. I did a DNS (search) on the (wendimurdoch.com) domain, overlooked that it had been registered a couple of weeks previously.”

(Hat tip: Name Ninja)

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Gene therapy company tries reverse domain name hijacking

Fri, 2019-01-18 15:05

Company went after domain name used by Houston medical practice.

This Houston medical practice is clearly not cybersquatting on a gene therapy company.

Gene therapy company Regenxbio Inc. tried to reverse domain name hijack the domain name RegenXHealth.com, a National Arbitration Forum panel has found.

RegenXHealth.com is used by a Houston men’s health medical practice.

The two companies have been battling over trademarks at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, a fact that Regenxbio failed to disclose in its complaint. It’s also quite clear that the respondent has a legitimate interest in the domain–it’s not like it set up a practice in Houston with signage and branding as an elaborate cybersquatting ruse.

In finding reverse domain name hijacking, the three-member panel wrote:

The Panel concludes that the evidence supports a determination that Complainant engaged in reverse domain-name hijacking. In reaching this determination, the Panel notes that: (1) Complainant asserted that Respondent, through the use of a privacy shield is “unknown” despite ample evidence, including the pending proceedings at the PTO and access to the Respondent’s website, that Complainant knew the Respondent’s identity; (2) Complainant’s argument that the parties are competitors, insofar as they both provide medical-related services, is disingenuous at best, given the highly differentiated nature of the services; and (3) Complainant’s assertion that Respondent’s website uses and displays Complainant’s REGENXBIO mark is not supported by the evidence

In view of the above, the Panel concludes that this proceeding was brought in bad faith and warrants a finding of reverse domain-name hijacking under Rule 15(e).

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Revamped team to give Topcoin a go

Thu, 2019-01-17 23:00

With a full-time staff, Topcoin is ready for new life.

A new team is taking a stab at Topcoin, the cryptocurrency-based customer loyalty program for digital goods.

While some of these people have been involved for a while, the company officially announced that Josh Metnick, Michael Blend, Ammar Kubba and John Detjen are part of the team working on relaunching Topcoin. Detjen is the CEO.

Uniregistry announced last month that it was dropping support for Topcoin. It was the biggest company issuing and redeeming Topcoin, so it was a big blow to the business.

Now Topcoin is doubling down.

“Topcoin has never, until now, had a full-time staff,” Detjen explained. “It has always been a part-time endeavor with no resources. Now we have six people working on it, with five devs.”

The company will launch a wallet app at NamesCon. It will also have five people on site to reach out to merchant partners.

In theory, Topcoin’s 21,000+ wallet holders could be a boon to companies that accept Topcoin. But they’ll need to offer meaningful redemption of the cryptocurrency.

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VPN.com owner launches domain brokerage

Thu, 2019-01-17 20:59

He spent $1 million on VPN.com. Now he wants to help other people sell domains.

When it comes to the power of good domain names, Michael Gargiulo puts his money where his mouth is.

Gargiulo bought VPN.com for close to $1 million in 2017 to launch a VPN comparison site. Since then he has been singing the praises of category-killer domain names through a Forbes column and other marketing.

Now he’s teaming up with Sharjil Saleem to launch a domain brokerage. Saleem has brokered a lot of top sales including ETH.com for $2 million.

Gargiulo has ambitious plans for 2019 and vows to broker over $25 million of domains this year.

While the domain brokerage field is crowded, it will be interesting to see if Gargiulo’s experience as a premium domain buyer helps convince other buyers about the value of great domain names.

You can listen to Gargiulo on DNW Podcast #176.

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DomainTools appeals injunction decision in .NZ case

Thu, 2019-01-17 17:51

Cyber security service wants injunction thrown out.

Whois data and security service DomainTools has appealed a preliminary injunction brought against it by .NZ registry Domain Name Commission Limited (DNCL).

DNCL sued DomainTools in June 2018 over DomainTools’ collection and publication of .NZ Whois data. It argued that DomainTools’ actions violated DNCL’s terms of service, which are provided with each Port 43 Whois query result.

A Federal District judge granted an injunction that ordered DomainTools to not collect any more .NZ Whois records and to remove any previously published records while the lawsuit proceeded.

DomainTools appealed the decision to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

In its opening brief (pdf), DomainTools argues that DNCL’s terms of service were not binding on DomainTools because of how the terms of service were published. Including the terms with each Whois result is considered a “browsewrap” agreement; the other party does not check a box or make any other affirmative action to agree to the terms.

DomainTools notes that “The lower court acknowledged that so-called “browsewrap” agreements like DNCL’s terms of use are not enforceable unless “the user has actual or constructive knowledge of the [terms of use].” In the court’s view, however, DomainTools’ repeat queries established sufficient knowledge.”

The company says that the lower court’s view should not apply because all of DomainTools’ Whois queries were “conducted by an automated program on a dedicated computer-to-computer channel acting without human intervention.”

It also says that the terms were written in a way that didn’t suggest that DomainTools’ use of the data violated the terms.

DomainTools wants the court to weigh the negative impact to DomainTools’ customers against the impact on .NZ registrants whose information is published.

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Related posts:
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Categories: News and Updates

Does this domain registration drop a hint about A Quiet Place 2?

Thu, 2019-01-17 14:43

Paramount makes an odd domain registration for A Quiet Place.

Is the sequel to A Quiet Place really a prequel?

One of last year’s biggest movie hits was A Quiet Place, which follows a family surviving after aliens invade earth.

A sequel is definitely on tap, but it might not be a sequel in a traditional sense. One idea based on director John Krasinski’s recent comments on a podcast is that it will follow other people surviving post-invasion.

But Paramount Pictures made an odd domain name registration today that got me thinking. The company registered 2aQuietPlaceMovie.com.

This is kind of weird. Wouldn’t it be AQuietPlaceMovie2.com?

That domain isn’t registered. Why put the 2 in front?

One idea is that the 2 is a play on ‘to’, and the sequel will actually be a prequel. The first movie picks up well after the invasion, and there’s a big storyline before the first movie even begins.

While I like this idea, I should note that ToAQuietPlaceMovie.com isn’t registered, and I’d think the studio would want this domain if ‘2’ really is a play on ‘to’. Of course, since this domain registration is so fresh, they could just be getting around to it now.

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No related posts.

Categories: News and Updates

My favorite domain names in the NamesCon auction

Wed, 2019-01-16 19:01

These are some of the most compelling names in the auction (for the price).

This year’s NamesCon live domain name auction is less than two weeks away. Prebidding is already underway with many domains already at 10+ bids.

Most of the names in the auction have a reserve. So far, the most expensive domain to meet its reserve is Multiplexer.com at $2,100.

I reviewed the list to find my favorite domains at the reserve range. There are obviously better names in the auction than many of the ones I selected, but given the reserve ranges, these are the ones I find most compelling.

Give.com (reserve > $1 million) – This domain sold for $500k in 2015. It reminds me a bit of Great.com and Super.com, which sold last year for about a million dollars each. Depending on how high over a million this domain is, it has good potential.

Lucky.com (> $1 million) – Between Lucky.io selling for $67k on park.io a few months ago, online gambling, and brands that use this name, it’s a winner.

Piano.com ($400k-$500k) – I’m thinking more as a brand than as an instrument site.

Document.com ($300k-$400k) – Files.com just sold for $750k. Document.com has more uses.

Athlete.com ($200k-$300k) – I’m including this one because it sold for $122k in the 2008 TRAFFIC auction. I’m curious if it can fetch near that amount ten years later.

Leukemia.com ($100k-$200k) – I realize this is difficult to spell but probably not for people who are fighting this horrible cancer. Health Union bought the .net last year for $9k. They build lots of sites on .net, but it might be worth spending a bit more for the .com in this case. Otherwise, perhaps a charity or drug maker can use this domain.

Adverbs.com ($5k-$10k) – I like this as a brand, but would prefer the singular version. The domain sold for $1,800 in 2011.

Bullied.com ($5k-$10k) – Perfect for a bully prevention organization or help group. This domain sold for $3,400 in 2007.

Wipeout.com ($5k-$10k) – I don’t know what you’d use it for…maybe a game? Even though it has a negative connotation, I think it’s a fun name for the right site.

The auction takes place January 28, 2019 at the Tropicana Hotel in Las Vegas and online. It is presented by Right of the Dot in conjunction with NameJet.

© DomainNameWire.com 2019. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

15 end user domain sales up to $60k

Wed, 2019-01-16 17:53

A pet products company, ceramic coatings manufacturer and truck enthusiast website bought domain names this past week.

This week we have end user sales from both Sedo and PerfectName.com. I’ve denoted the PerfectName sales; all others are at Sedo.

The beginning of the year is usually a good time for domain sales so I look forward to seeing a bunch of good end user sales soon.

Let’s get to the list, and you can view previous lists like this here.

RedBarn.com $60,750 – Red Barn Pet Products bought the shorter version of its domain RedBarnInc.com. (PerfectName)

Jujube.com $29,750 – Backpack and accessories store jujube bought this nice upgrade to its ju-ju-be.com domain name. (PerfectName)

Sego.com $16,250 – Bannermate, maker of the SEG popup displays. (PerfectName)

SystemX.com $12,500 – Element 119 sells ceramic coatings under the System X brand. It forwards its new domain to Element119.com. (PerfectName)

Lokalnachrichten.de €10,000 – This domain has a coming soon page and states the site is run by a journalism professor and author. It translates to “local news”.

SaleInTop.com $9,075 – Another top sale for the SedoMLS network, this currently forwards to NorCalMLKFoundation.org. This is the Northern California Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Foundation, a charitable organization with programs and initiatives in health, civic engagement, social justice, and art & culture. Not sure what this domain will be used for within this organization.

Dartmoor.com $6,875 – Princetown Distillers Ltd is opening The Dartmoor Distillery. (PerfectName)

FileBox.cn $5,385 – FileBox.com, a data cloud storage service, bought the Chinese ccTLD of its domain name.

Noma.de €5,800 – Forwards to Hilfsaktionnoma.de, a German-based charitable organization providing education and prevention activities, such as vaccinations and support against malnourishment.

TruckJunkie.com $5,000 – Based in the Netherlands, this catchy domain now services truck enthusiasts worldwide with parts and accessories.

ZoomDigital.com €5,000- This isn’t resolving yet but Zoom Advertising, a full-service retail focused creative agency out of Chicago that operates from ZoomChicago.com, bought the domain.

PayBit.se €4,999 – Cryptocurrency payment platform that supports all cryptocurrency forms and offers automatic conversions. They operate from the .com of this domain but with this purchase now also own the Swedish ccTLD.

AmericanRubber.com $4,500 – The buyer is a director at United American Healthcare Corporation but has several other ventures, including an investment firm. I suspect this domain is for one of those ventures.

CSCOnline.com $3,000 – CSC is a Lebanese payments company.

Wonders.es €2,000 – This Spanish shoe brand currently forwards to wonders.com but now will own the Spanish ccTLD to be better represented where they’re headquartered.

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Categories: News and Updates

How the competitive domain registrar market keeps prices down

Wed, 2019-01-16 15:16

No matter what Verisign charges them, registrar profits on .com are limited by competition.

Last year the U.S. Government granted the ability for Verisign (NASDAQ: VRSN) to raise prices on .com domain names pending approval from ICANN.

Where does that extra money go? As the sole wholesaler of .com domain names, every penny that Verisign raises the price of .com domain names goes to its bottom line. Domain registrars do their best to pass the price increase on to consumers, but their margins continue to be held down by the competitive market.

Indeed, while domain registrars can charge whatever they want for .com, market forces prevent them from charging much over the wholesale cost.

Take a look at this chart from Tucows’ (NASDAQ: TCX) third quarter investor Q&A:

It shows the revenue that Tucows generates each year from .com sales as well as the gross margin. As you can see, it sells more and more .com domains but it makes roughly the same amount of margin ($8 million) each year.

Tucows CEO Elliot Noss wrote:

… .com has a strange place for us, and I suspect most registrars. It is still by far the largest top level domain. It is still by far the one that end users want as first priority. It still dominates our discussions with resellers. And over time it has become less and less impactful to our gross margin dollars. The data, going back to the launch of OpenSRS in 2000 speaks volumes. The unit volume of .com sold goes up every year. The amount of money we pay to Verisign goes up commensurately. And the amount of money that the competitive registrar market allows us to generate stays flat. Like the prairies. Amazingly flat over now 18 years. And on a % basis it has gone from us making 40% of the .com revenue generated in 2000, all the way down to 12% in 2018. We make a little under $8 million per year on .com. That was true in both 2000 and 2018. They made roughly $19 million from our .com sales in 2000. In 2017 that number was nearly $67 million. This price increase only exacerbates that trend. And of course we believe that registrars do, by far, the lion’s share of the work to generate that revenue.

While the price of .com has increased from $6.00 to $7.85 over the past 18 years, the biggest impact on profits is competition amongst domain registrars.

Noss is also pointing out that registrars (not Verisign) do the most work to promote .com’s growth.

If .com prices increase in a couple of years, Tucows will have to pass these costs directly to customers. It will probably still generate a gross margin of about $8 million a year from .com but on a bigger revenue base.

I’ve heard the argument that Verisign should have price flexibility for .com because registrars have complete price flexibility. The difference is that Verisign has a monopoly while the registrars work in a highly competitive market.

© DomainNameWire.com 2019. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
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  3. Digging into Tucows’ annual report
Categories: News and Updates

Create an SPF record to show that your domain does NOT send email

Tue, 2019-01-15 16:19

Add an SPF record to prevent spoofing.

Add a SPF record to keep people from spoofing your domain in emails.

When it comes to email deliverability, most people are trying to figure out how to ensure their mail lands in the inbox. But what if you want to tell email providers that they should not accept email from a domain name? This might be the case if you have a parked domain that someone is trying to spoof when it sends email.

One option is to create a Sender Policy Framework (SPF) record that says all mail should be rejected. To do this, go to your domain name registrar and manage the DNS for the domain.

Create a TXT record and include this text:

v=spf -all

This will tell mailbox providers that your domain name should not send any email, giving them an indication that email with your address should be considered spam.

Domain name owners should consider adding SPF records to their parked domains if they don’t use them for email.

© DomainNameWire.com 2019. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

AddictingGames.com sues Addicting.com, claiming cybersquatting

Tue, 2019-01-15 14:38

Addicting.com parked page filled with links for games.

Addicting Games screenshot

The popular online game site Addicting Games filed an in rem lawsuit (pdf) yesterday against the domain name Addicting.com, claiming that the owner of the domain is cybersquatting. Addicting Games is owned by Bill Karamouzis, who was on DNW Podcast #178.

The lawsuit points out that almost all the pay-per-click links on Addicting.com, which is parked at Uniregistry, are related to games. The first link is “Addicting Games”.

One big question is when the current owner of the domain acquired it.

The lawsuit alleges:

On February 21, 2018, the registrant of the domain Addicting.com was changed from Domain Hostmaster, Customer ID : 85528474484681 to Savvy Investments, LLC Privacy ID #735277, and the registrar was changed from Fabulous.com Pty Ltd to Sea Wash, LLC.

Sea Wasp, LLC is just the business name for Fabulous, so the registrar didn’t actually change.

The Whois record is private going back to the end of 2011.

From at least as early as 2004 until the record was private, the domain was owned by a registrant in Vietnam. The domain has been parked with Uniregistry since at least 2013. So I suspect that there was not an ownership change this year, although it’s possible.

There’s a chance that the domain is currently owned by the same entity that owned it since at least 2004, which is before Addicting Games existed.

That said, the links on the parked page (which have been there since at least 2013) are definitely problematic and could present a trademark problem for the domain owner.

It will be interesting to see if the owner of Addicting.com defends the domain name in court.

David Weslow of Wiley Rein LLP is representing Addicting Games.

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Don’t respond to “Good luck with that”

Mon, 2019-01-14 17:53

It’s just a waste of your time.

Have you ever received this response when you quote a price for one of your domain names?

“Good luck with that.”

It’s a bit of an insult. Like someone is calling you crazy.

It could be tempting to respond to the person and tell them why you aren’t crazy but I don’t think it’s worth it 99% of the time.

For example, this weekend I received an inquiry on CandyCorn.com. I looked up the inquirer and saw that it was a really small business in a really small town. I almost didn’t respond because it didn’t seem qualified. But you never know, so I quoted $35,000.

I got the “good luck with that” response.

I could huff and puff and tell them why I’m not crazy and educate them on the value of domain names…but why? It would be a waste of my time and their time. It’s better to just move on.

The exception would be if someone comes out with a decent starting point offer. For example, if someone who seemed qualified offered $10k for the name but said “good luck with that” to $35k, it might be worth discussing domain value to see if we can close the gap.

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Sedo makes expired list downloadable, Name.com changes happy hour

Mon, 2019-01-14 16:59

Download lists to look for good domains, and you now have longer to buy discounted domains at Name.com.

Sedo’s expired domain lists are now downlodable.

A couple of quick news items for you on this Monday morning…

Sedo made its expired domain name inventory list downloadable. The marketplace auctions off expiring domain names from registrar 1&1 which is part of the same company as Sedo. But sorting through the list to find good domains is difficult. Now you can download the list and run it through services like Estibot to find the best domains. I also hope this means that expired domain data sites like ExpiredDomains.net start to provide data on these domains.

Also, Name.com has ended its Happy Hour sale concept in favor of monthly specials. The Name.com Happy Hour was a special promo (usually on one top level domain) that ran for a short time on Thursday afternoons. It’s a lot of effort to schedule time to register a domain to save a few bucks. Now, Name.com has a week-long sale each month. The kicker is you need to go to the sale page and get the discount code to get the discount. You’ll pay more if you try to register one of the sale domains and don’t use the discount code.

This month’s sale includes 30 new top level domains, most from Donuts’ portfolio. Donuts owns Name.com.

© DomainNameWire.com 2019. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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WordPress Plugins + 2 more predictions – DNW Podcast #219

Mon, 2019-01-14 16:30

How to avoid bad WordPress plugins.

This week on the DNW podcast meet Mika Epstein, a WordPress engineer at DreamHost. She explains what to look for in WordPress plugins to make sure you aren’t opening up a backdoor to your website. We also hear predictions from Natasa Djukanovic and Braden Pollock.

Plus: NameSilo acquisition, much ado about ado.com, .homes, domain hijacking, hosting merger, NameBio and more.

Subscribe via iTunes to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, view on Google Play Music, or click play above or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)

© DomainNameWire.com 2019. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Newspack could solve one of WordPress’ problems

Mon, 2019-01-14 14:21

WordPress-for-newsrooms could help small publishers avoid the IT guy.

There’s a problem with WordPress: it’s too complicated for the typical small business owner. It’s also too complicated for the typical small news publisher.

So it’s exciting to hear that Google (NASDAQ: GOOGL), Lenfest Institute for Journalism, The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation and Civil Media are all contributing financially to an effort by WordPress creator Automattic to create Newspack. Google calls it “a fast, secure, low-cost publishing system tailor-made to the needs of small newsrooms”.

This sums it up nicely:

Journalists should be writing stories and covering their communities, not worrying about designing websites, configuring CMSs, or building commerce systems. Their publishing platform should solve these problems for them. So while Newspack publishers will have access to all the plugins created by the WordPress developer community, the core product is not trying to be all things to all publishers. It is trying to help small publishers succeed by building best practices into the product while removing distractions that may divert scarce resources. We like to call it “an opinionated CMS:” it knows the right thing to do, even when you don’t.

It will be exciting to see the finished product. Hopefully, this is a sign of things to come: easy-to-use installments of WordPress.

© DomainNameWire.com 2019. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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