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Is domain investing worth your time?

Fri, 2020-05-29 14:08

Some time spent is wasted, but trying new approaches is essential.

There was an interesting discussion on twitter this week about domain names and the time you spend investing. It kicked off with George Kirikos sharing details of his experiment listing domains on NameLiquidate. He was going to let the 5 domains expire. He managed to sell two of them for total proceeds of $16.38:

Correction: A *2nd* domain just got sold via @nameliquidate , so that’s 2 out of 5, for a grand total of 2x$9×91% (i.e. 9% commission) = $16.38!

Not bad for domains that would have otherwise expired “worthless” and not been renewed. https://t.co/Ctk3geSciB

— George Kirikos (@GeorgeKirikos) May 28, 2020

Shane Cultra chimed in about how this is a horrible use of time given the results. Kirikos responded by saying, “you have to put in the initial “setup” time for anything.”

They’re both right. A $16.38 return on just about any time spent is terrible, but you can consider the time spent an investment in testing.

You have to test things to see what works and what doesn’t. A lot of stuff I test returns nothing. Others return a goldmine. Savvy domain investors test, test, and test some more.

As a very relevant example, I also tested listing domains on NameLiquidate recently. I listed about 10 expiring domains and none of them sold.

This isn’t a surprise. I was about to let the domains expire, so I shouldn’t expect people to pay $9 or more for them. (Granted, on GoDaddy Auctions, they might sell as part of the expiry stream.)

A lot of what domain investors do doesn’t pay off. Other stuff pays off in spades. Sometimes it’s a matter of refining a system to make it work. NameLiquidate is a good idea and I will try it again.

I often think that domain investors undervalue their time. However, you can get satisfaction from these activities. I can look at reviewing drop lists as a waste of time for some weeks. Maybe I spend an hour looking at the lists and a couple of hours bidding, only to end up with nothing. But I have to admit, I don’t look at reviewing drop lists as just time spent. I kind of enjoy it. I enjoy kicking back on the porch with a glass of whiskey and searching for hidden gems.

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Related posts:
  1. Did P2P lending cause a Chinese bubble, and is it bursting?
  2. GoDaddy promotes domain investing on its homepage
  3. Those domains you’re sitting on? They will probably never sell.
Categories: News and Updates

Mark Cuban collaborates on PPP.bank for Paycheck Protection Program forgiveness

Fri, 2020-05-29 00:05

.Bank domain used for loan forgiveness application wizard.

PPP.bank helps small businesses apply for loan forgiveness.

Mark Cuban has worked with Jill Castilla at Citizens Bank of Edmond to launch PPP.bank, reports American Banker.

The site enables small businesses to generate their Paycheck Protection Program forgiveness applications through an online wizard.

.Bank domain name registry TLD Registry Services expedited the registration of PPP.bank. .Bank domains have a verification process that can take several days to complete.

HugeDomains owns PPPbank.com, which was registered in 2013.

Teslar Software created the technology and Mark Cuban is providing server capacity.

The service launches on Friday, which is the first day that borrowers can submit applications. Applicants might want to hold off on applying for loan forgiveness, though. Congress is still considering changes to the program that might make it more favorable to borrowers.

Post link: Mark Cuban collaborates on PPP.bank for Paycheck Protection Program forgiveness

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Related posts:
  1. Report: Mark Cuban wants to buy back Broadcast.com
Categories: News and Updates

Google to consider “page experience” in rankings

Thu, 2020-05-28 20:58

Experience metrics to be used in rankings.

Google is going to start using “Core Web Vitals” as a ranking signal for websites.

Core Web Vitals measure critical aspects of the user experience. These include load time, interactivity, and the stability of content as it loads.

Google said the changes wouldn’t happen until at least next year, and the company will give six-months’ notice.

It’s worth noting that Google uses hundreds of signals to determine rankings. It will always prioritize good content over things like Core Web Vitals. The company noted:

While all of the components of page experience are important, we will prioritize pages with the best information overall, even if some aspects of page experience are subpar. A good page experience doesn’t override having great, relevant content. However, in cases where there are multiple pages that have similar content, page experience becomes much more important for visibility in Search.

I’ve found that much of the concern over penalizing sites that are not mobile-friendly was overblown. You can expect the addition of this new signal to be modest at first.

Post link: Google to consider “page experience” in rankings

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Categories: News and Updates

Short domain with a long history sells for $70,050

Thu, 2020-05-28 17:23

Once owned by CNET China, 55BBS.com sells for big bucks at DropCatch.com.

As someone who enjoyed the golden days of BBS, I thought I knew exactly what 55BBS.com was developed for. How wrong I was!

BBS is the acronym for “Bulletin Board System”, an internet service very popular in the 1980s and 1990s. I still remember that day when I posted a message on a BBS, which resulted in a long-term partnership with a Japanese company.

Actually, 55BBS.com has nothing to do with BBS. It was launched in 2004 as a forum for young Chinese women to discuss fashion, shopping, and other life style issues, with discounts on products offered to registered members. The brand name was Wo Ai Da Zhe (我爱打折=I love discount). The idea was a big hit, yet the company did not upgrade to the matching WADZ.com (which did not resolve at that time).

In 2008, 55BBS.com was sold to CNET China for about 55 million yuan ($8.3 million) as CNET was expanding into the lifestyle and fashion areas. The brand name remained Wo Ai Da Zhe, but apparently, no efforts were made to acquire WADZ.com, which still did not resolve.

In 2015, CNET sold 55BBS.com for only 6.8 million yuan (about $1 million). The new owner changed the brand name to “55Style” and then applied to list it on NEEQ (新三板). However, they did not upgrade to the brand-matching 55Style.com, which was listed for sale with multiple contact methods.

On May 29, 2019, the website disappeared from Wayback Machine records, so apparently the business was gone. Just a few days ago, 55BBS.com sold for $70,050 in an auction after it had expired.

The domains WADZ.com and 55Style.com were not expensive to acquire, but the companies failed to recognize the importance of acquiring brand-matching domains. In fact, this issue exists even today, so there are still a lot of opportunities in selling your domains to China as upgrades.

Post link: Short domain with a long history sells for $70,050

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Categories: News and Updates

20 end user domain sales including a $50k .in sale

Thu, 2020-05-28 13:15

An online event platform, several software companies, and a cosmetic laser franchise bought domain names.

 

It was quite a week for end user sales with nearly 20 hits including one of the highest .IN sales to date, Hop.in. This is their company name so it makes perfect sense that they invested in it even at its high price tag.

Here’s a look at some of the domains end users bought at Sedo this past week. You can review previous end user sales lists here.

Hop.in $50,000 – Hopin is an online events production company. I wrote about its domain Hopin.to last week. This will be a nice shortener.

Hoss.com $29,995 – Hoss allows people to track and manage third-party APIs.

FullPlay.com $23,500 – The domain resolves to a website that claims FullPlay is the “Future of Marketing”.

JobsRUs.com $9,999 – CorTech LLC, which operates a jobs listing site on the domain. It’s not my favorite domain, but it beats its old one: JobStalker.net!

RentALev.com $9,888 – The buyer of ElectricCar.com (which was the top sale last week).

Klient.com $7,000 – Krow Software, a Professional Services Automation software company.

MaVacation.com $5,000 – Forwards to charlestonmedia.online, a “locals-led” travel site.

TopGene.com $5,000 – TopGene’s original core business is personalized non-invasive diagnostics to treat cancer but they have since established a new business unit dedicated to medical and KN95 masks.

Ravona.com $3,900 – A Korean professional sports gear manufacturer and design company.

ESigner.com $3,800 – The whois shows eSigner as the company name but it’s difficult to attach this to a specific company.

Gynaekologie-Muenchen.de €3,600 – Forwards to Gynaekologie-Koeln.de, a gynecology practice in Cologne, Germany.

LaserAway.com $3,500 – Laser Away is a cosmetic laser service franchise with multiple locations in the U.S.

Welt.net €3,500 – Forwards to Welt.de. “DIE WELT” is a German newspaper and this site is their corresponding online magazine for their news items and live video streams of political speeches and news.

KetoDiet.ch €2,900 – Forwards to KetoDiet.eu, a website about the popular Keto diet with related supplements and products for purchase.

Arbeitschreiben.de €2,499 – This is an individual’s website in German offering information and know-how on writing scientific papers.

ZeroTolerance.de €2,380 – Forwards to Thomas-Teleservice.de, a service provider for smartphone repairs. You can also buy single components to make repairs yourself.

TampaWebDesigner.com $2,355 – Forwards to Ideas4.com, a digital and web design agency.

Sundr.de €2,000 – Forwards to the website for Sendatzki + Rosenthal Autoteile und Lacke, a group of auto-related companies.

Immocom.de €2,000 – Forwards to Wundr.de, a political and PR consulting firm in Eastern Germany. They handle marketing and public relations for companies within the real estate industry.

TaxFix.nl €2,000 – Website about taxation in the Netherlands aimed at individuals and small entrepreneurs.

Post link: 20 end user domain sales including a $50k .in sale

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Categories: News and Updates

GoDaddy fixes glitch that upgraded privacy

Wed, 2020-05-27 21:40

Some customers were upgraded to a much more expensive privacy product.

A month ago, a man in Scotland reported an unwelcome charge from GoDaddy:

Very disappointed with @GoDaddy (yes, I shoud know better than using them) – I let a domain autorenew only to find the original whois protection costing £7.99 has been replaced with a “Ultimate Privacy Protection” package costing £21.98!

Cont…

— Cameron Gray (@camerongray1515) April 27, 2020

Whois privacy protection on Cameron Gray’s domain was upgraded to GoDaddy’s much more expensive “Ultimate Privacy Protection”.

Gray said that a GoDaddy support representative told him that he was upgraded because regular Whois privacy was no longer needed due to GDPR.

As it turns out, the support representative gave him incorrect information. GoDaddy says the service change was a bug that it has fixed. It is unclear how many customers were impacted.

Customers outside of the European Union also might not have to pay to have their Whois information redacted in the future. GoDaddy is working on changes to the information it provides.

Post link: GoDaddy fixes glitch that upgraded privacy

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Categories: News and Updates

Someone wants to trademark “makeOffer” for domain forwarding

Wed, 2020-05-27 20:08

It’s a ubiquitous term in the domain industry.

Someone is trying to trademark “makeOffer” for domain forwarding. This screenshot shows the common use of the term at Sedo, a leading domain marketplace.

An Austin man has filed a trademark application (serial 88833592) for “makeOffer” for “Computer services, namely, domain forwarding services.”

Make Offer is, of course, a common term in the domain name industry for unpriced domain names seeking an offer.

Mark Estabrook operates a site at MakeOffer.site. He submitted a screenshot from the site as his specimen. The page reads:

makeOffer

you landed here because the domain name you typed in your browser’s URL was forwarded here. a person or organization owns the name and wants us to broker it for them privately. it can be yours. to begin the process, tell us which name you are interested in and SUBMIT a reasonable offer. as seller’s agent, we will forward your offer and if seller wants to respond we will contact you.

The trademark application cites a first use date of March 8, 2020.

I emailed Estrabrook yesterday to understand his objective in trademarking the term. I have not yet heard back.

Post link: Someone wants to trademark “makeOffer” for domain forwarding

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Categories: News and Updates

Decoding last month’s Web.com aftermarket sales

Wed, 2020-05-27 16:30

Joseph Peterson shares what sold on NameJet and SnapNames last month, and what the domains could be used for.

 

“Oh but they’re weird and they’re wonderful” – these domain sales.  B-B-B-“Bennie and the Jets” by Elton John is how I first heard the word “mohair”.  Bennie (whoever she is) has “got electric boots, a mohair suit / You know I read it in a magazine.”  So the song goes.  Electric boots may be sci-fi, but mohair is as real as the Angora goat from which the wool of this luxury textile is shorn.  It’s used in carpets, coats, scarves, socks, and of course suits.  Since mohair is a relatively expensive commodity, we shouldn’t be surprised to see the sale of Mohair.com ($5.1k) among other auction results from NameJet and SnapNames during April.

But the biggest sale was Khols .com ($81.6k).  Déjà vu?  At first, I thought this must be a repeat auction because I covered the sale of a Kohl’s typo from January: Koles.com ($73.0k).  Someone is serious about buying typos of this department-store brand name.  Each of these was the top auction during the month in question.

999555.com ($44.0k) was the runner up.  I can’t say for certain why that 6-digit domain is worth 11 times as much as 747777.com ($4.1k), which also has a repeating pattern.  But it may have something to do with the numeral “4”, which is reputedly unlucky in China.  Another 6-digit domain with a repeating pattern sold just above the $2k reporting threshold: 902902.com ($2.1k).  Short numerical domains don’t need such repeating patterns to sell high, as the 3rd-highest sale shows: 1740.com ($20.5k).

Mould.com ($20.4k) was the 4th highest sale.  Here too, attentive readers should feel a twinge of déjà vu because DNW reported the sale of the plural, Moulds.com ($10.0k), back in December.  Notably, that was an end-user purchase via Sedo.  Did the same Chinese company pay twice as much for the singular?  This doesn’t strike me as a wholesale price, but sometimes ambitious domainers outbid end users in the heat of the moment.  Interestingly, the variant spelling was also sold as a .NET last month: MOLD.net ($2.2k).

While we’re on the subject of “Not-.COM” sales, let me point out that NameJet and SnapNames sold a total of 82 domains above the $2k threshold; and of these, 10 were not .COM – 6 .ORG, 3 .NET, and 1 .INFO.  My personal favorite was Activist.org ($2.6k).  As a rallying point, it’s ideal for branding; and the price strikes me as a bargain.  The highest sale was StatesAttorney.org ($10.0k), which is also political in nature.  Other interesting items include CreativeAging.org ($4.0k) and FuelCells.org ($3.3k).  If I mention HAARP.net ($2.3k), will a swarm of flying monkeys descend on this blog?  Conspiracy theories regarding the U.S. military installation, HAARP, are rampant.  Apparently it’s a plot to control the weather, a fiendish mind-control device, and the cause of an earthquake in Haiti.  Plausible.

When it comes to brand names, I’m not always 100% in favor of creative misspellings because they can cause ambiguity when the name is heard and not seen.  Domainers would call that the “radio test”.  And yet there are exceptions to every rule.  Fonic.com ($12.6k) is short and sweet, and it’s spelled phonetically – with “F” rather than the less common “PH”.  This can help with international branding, since many languages would use an “F” rather than “PH” for cognates.  For example, “telePHone” (English) is “teleFono” (Spanish).

There were a number of strong “brandable” domain sales: Nautico.com ($5.6k), Eventy.com ($3.6k), Digitary.com ($3.2k), Naturae.com ($2.5k), Breco.com ($2.2k), QCare.com ($2.2k), Celsus.com ($2k).  It’s tempting to think of such domains as a blank canvas, but often there will already be 1 or more brands using the name.  A good example of this is ProSim.com ($3.6k), which might be an upgrade for either ProSim-AR.com (aviation research) or ProSim.net (simulation software) or else be used for an unrelated startup.  MegaTel.com ($3.7k) seems to fit a New Zealand telecom and utilities company.

The foregoing list of “brandables” are neologisms that look and feel like a single word.  A different sort of “brandable” domain would consist of 2 dictionary words in combination.  Plenty of these sold as well: YourTown.com ($6.1k) and WeSearch.com ($5.5k); WeedTown.com ($2.2k) and CafeWorld.com ($4.7k); CareerNetwork.com ($3.2k) and CoolHomes.com ($3.2k).  The last pair hardly seem invented at all – more like an overheard phrase.

DIYWebsite.com ($2.5k) is a good name for a website builder or tutorial.  I assume the “U” in UGirls.com ($4.1k) stands for “university”, but conceivably it means “you”.  HellaWella.com ($7.3k) seems to match a health and wellness brand that was active on Twitter and Facebook as recently as 2016.  Maybe it’s being revived.  Maybe someone else just likes the name.  Or maybe there’s enough SEO value in the backlinks from an old website to justify that price tag.  It’s a good brand name, regardless.  For the benefit of non-American readers, “Hella” is a slang term common in parts of the USA.  It derives from “hell of a” – as in “That’s one hell of a car!”  And it means “very”.  For instance, “Hella good” = “Very good”.  Since “hella” sounds like “health”, transforming the phrase “health and wellness” until it becomes “hella wella” is pretty clever.  The name deserves to live on even if some prior project stalled.

IndiaTrade.com ($2.4k) has obvious uses in commerce.  AfricaTime.com ($3k) might promote tourism or be for a domestic audience.  Yakutsk.com ($2.1k) is a city in Russia.  HatYai.com ($3.4k) a city in Thailand.  Nothing against the 2nd coldest city in the world, but I’d prefer to visit the latter.  Speaking of cities, Pueblos.com ($2.5k) is Spanish for “towns” or “villages”.

Boeuf.com ($2.4k) is French for “beef”.  Obviously, that’s something most of us buy; so there must be some commercial value in a website about it, although most of us will never choose to visit a site about beef, let alone order a steak online.  In contrast, we might well visit ElectricBlankets.com ($3.5k) to order an electric blanket.  Or check LoanRate.com ($13.5k) to get a quote.  Or even visit FuneralPlans.com ($3.1k) in order to plan a funeral.

In the age of Google, would we need a directory of local carpet cleaners, a la CarpetCleaningService.com ($2.3k)?  Possibly not.  But the domain might be used by a single local business to attract clicks in search results or as a memorable address in print or radio advertising.  Certainly, it’s a bit long, and CarpetCleaning.com would be far better.  Nevertheless, the domain gets to the point.  Similarly, LightCompany.com ($3k) is a bit dull; but it’s generic enough that it might convey some authority or be used to brand a company in a straightforward, no-nonsense way.

Touche.com ($18.7k) is a French word that has been absorbed into English.  Originally it came from fencing.  When touched by the opponent’s sword, one would acknowledge the hit by saying “touché”.  It has come to mean something like “Well played!  You got me.”  There is no obvious application for this word other than fencing (or possibly debate).  But like so many single dictionary-word .COM domains, this one can function as something of a blank canvas.

4-letter .COM sales are a bit boring.  So let me just get those out of the way by listing them: IAAS.com ($11.4k), ISMY.com ($4.9k), GAFU.com ($3.7k), FAHI.com ($3k), SHID.com ($2.5k), MAIW.com ($2.5k), CSAI.com ($2.4k), TEMY.com ($2.3k).  On the whole, these are pronounceable and/or use common initial letters from English and other western languages.  In other words, they don’t resemble the vowel-less “CHIPs” that were all the rage during the Chinese surge a few years ago.

Even so, the Chinese domain market is very strong.  The #2, #3, and #4 sales in this article all have a China connection, as do others.  JunJun.com ($18.5k) may refer to an actress, a makeup artist with a sizeable Instagram following, or even simply be the Filipino version of “Junior”.  Given the price tag – it was the 6th highest sale – I assume it’s out of range for the Instagram influencer.  WangJiu.com ($4.1k) and ShangCe.com ($4k) are both personal names, but I didn’t see any bullseyes for a single most likely buyer.  Probably not the Shangce Gao who wrote a paper on a “meta-heuristic … gravitational search algorithm”, despite his being the top result in SERPs for “Shangce”.  Not the sort of person who wor

Gambling domains are seldom absent from these monthly sales lists, and April was no exception: SlotOnline .com ($3.2k) and RaceFan s.com ($2.1k).  But profit isn’t the only motive for buying a good domain.  Policing is a hotly debated topic in the USA, given perceived racial bias and use of excessive force.  Possibly Policing.com ($4.4k) will be used for activism in that arena.  Wawawa.com ($4.6k) might go to a bistro in Singapore.  GeoDome.com ($2.6k) undoubtedly refers to geodesic domes.

When I first saw truera.com ($2.7k) written in lower case – as domains all tend to be displayed online – I wasn’t sure whether to pronounce it as “Troo eh ra” or “True R.A.” or what.  Finally it dawned on me that it’s “Tru Era” without an “e”.  And that’s the name of an agency offering everything from DJs and dancers to videography and web design.

PhiloTV.com ($4.0k) seems clearly aimed at a company called Philo, which offers packages of TV channels in the USA.  They already operate Philo.com.  There was a second TV sale as well: SpaceTV.com ($4.7k).  And on the opposite end of the chronological spectrum falls EarlyCinema.com ($2.3k)

DeepRobotics.com ($2.3k) would be about deep learning and artificial intelligence.  I suppose that domain sale is 1 more step toward the inevitable Terminator scenario of robots enslaving humanity.  But for now, I’m still waiting for some electric boots.

Post link: Decoding last month’s Web.com aftermarket sales

© DomainNameWire.com 2020. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact editor (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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  3. Hi Wanda, here’s what sold at Web.com last month
Categories: News and Updates

Interview: Dofo aims to fix domain search

Wed, 2020-05-27 13:30

Domain search company wants to make it easier to find domains to register or buy.

 

Finding aftermarket domain names is difficult. The two big domain marketplaces, Sedo and Afternic, don’t have search functions that help domain investors find domains that fit their metrics.

Dofo is trying to change that. I asked Dofo Founder & CEO Macit Tuna via email how his site can help domain investors and end users find available domains on the primary market and aftermarket. This interview has been lightly edited for clarity.

Domain Name Wire: What is your background with domains and what’s the origin of Dofo?

Tuna: I started to be interested in domain names at the beginning of the 2000s. At first, it was just a hobby to check if a domain name was available or not. I wasn’t buying domain names, only making lists in Excel and checking their availability when I could use the Internet. Then I started to register domain names, then buy a few domain names for our own projects with my brother, Sacit.

After seeing the potential of buying and selling domain names, I started investing in domain names, of course, with a limited budget at that time. I also started a blog about domaining in 2007 and published more than 200 articles in Turkish. I also gave some courses in the universities about domain names and domain name disputes.

Starting from the 2010s, I was more interested in domain name related products other than buying and selling domain names. I built my own mini-programs to check domain name availability, expiring domain names, etc. At that time, I was thinking about making something big, that covered all domain names, marketplaces, expiring domain names, whois, etc. Of course, building something like that is not so easy: you have to have a very talented team, a high budget/fund, and more importantly the patience. Thank God, we could gather all we needed together and started to build Dofo. Because we are dealing with enormous data, it was not easy to build and maintain something like that. Now, although there are still many things to do, Dofo is working well and used by thousands of people every day.

DNW: Would you say your site is geared to end-users or investors?

Tuna: We want to show to the end-users how it’s easy to search and find the domain names they want. It might sound interesting, but most of the end-users still don’t know how to check if a domain name is registered or not. They don’t know there are more than 30 million domain names listed for sale on marketplaces. We know that without reaching the end-users and raising awareness, it’s impossible to see the real potential of the domain name industry.

Of course, targeting the end-users doesn’t mean the domain investors don’t use Dofo.com. There are hundreds of domain investors using dofo.com every day. We need more support from the domain investors and the industry players, especially from the bloggers.

DNW: What do you think about the current state of search for aftermarket domain names?

Tuna: I want to answer this question by explaining what we are doing to make search easier and better on Dofo. We tested almost a hundred different user interfaces and search functionalities. We did a lot of research to serve a better user experience to our users. We read UX reports dedicated to search; some of them were consisting of more than one hundred pages. We asked our users, and we analyzed the search filters’ usage to make the search better.

Search is and should be the most crucial feature of any domain marketplace, and if the search fails, everything fails. Because most of the domain marketplaces’ websites are not newly developed, the searches don’t generally satisfy the customers’ expectations.

We are trying to keep search as simple as possible while we provide advanced filters. On Dofo, you can filter domain names by:

  • extension and extension type (gTLD – ccTLD)
  • price (min-max)
  • keywords (contain, start with, end with, exact match, not contain)
  • sale type (buy now, make offer, auction, available soon/backorder)
  • length (min-max)
  • special characters (letter, number, hyphen: include-exclude)
  • IDN (include-exclude)
  • domain create date (min-max date)
  • marketplace
  • language (still beta)

People search for keywords in general, but we also give the opportunity to filter whatever they want. I also use Dofo’s search to find good domain names for our new products.

DNW: How do you get access to inventory information from marketplaces such as Afternic and Sedo? It seems that they don’t provide a feed of their inventory.

We made partnerships with almost all domain marketplaces such as Sedo, Uniregistry Market, and Afternic. We are listing the inventory of sixteen marketplaces on Dofo, as of May 2020.

Each marketplace has its own method to share the inventory data. Dofo is one of the members of Afternic’s Reseller Network, and we get a daily data feed for the domains listed on Afternic. We are also a member of the SedoMLS Platinum Program. Although Sedo doesn’t provide a data feed, they give access APIs to check if a domain name is listed on Sedo.

It’s not easy to make an integration with all the marketplaces, but we do this. We update the marketplace data daily.

DNW: What features do you have in the pipeline?

There are still so many things to do.

We started to focus more on Dofo Blog and we publish several articles every week. Dofo Blog will always have the top priority. I should also mention that we appreciate what you have been doing at DNW for the past 15 years. DNW has become the memory of the domain industry and has become an essential resource for anyone interested in domain names.

One of the most important features we want to add to Dofo is a User Dashboard. Our users will be able to follow domain names and will be get notified whenever any change occurs about a domain name: whois update, on sale status change, etc. For example, follow a domain name and get notified if this domain name is listed for sale on any marketplace. Or follow your own domain names to keep track of whois changes.

We already launched The Lists feature, but it’s not fully functional yet. You will be able to create your own list, and you will also be able to follow lists. Lists are pre-defined searches created by us for you. For example, in “4N COM Domains For Sale List”, the four-letter .com domain names for sale are listed. You can check the “Bitcoin Domain Names For Sale” list if you are looking for bitcoin domain names.

We have created the very first version of Dofo Browser Extension. We will add more features to it soon. For now, it shows if the visited domain name or any similar domain is for sale in any marketplace.

We are discussing creating a mobile application with our team. But because the mobile web version of Dofo is good enough, we don’t feel a hurry to create it.

Translating Dofo into other languages is also what we will work on in the next few months. Keyword Popularity Tool and Smart Domain Finder for Startups are the other things we are discussing.

Post link: Interview: Dofo aims to fix domain search

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Reviewing 4-character domains sold in April

Tue, 2020-05-26 20:36

Would these domains make good upgrades for Chinese companies?

 

One of my interests is to find end users in China for .com domains as upgrades. In this article, I’ll look at some 4-character domains sold in April that could be valuable to companies in China. This methodology might help you when you think about selling domains to Chinese companies.

Note that I always check both .cn and .com.cn in my end user research. This is because even though .cn has about 9 times the registration volume of .com.cn, there are still many companies using .com.cn.

FFP2.com sold for $6,492. FFP2 .com.cn forwards to 9175QX .com, which looks like a betting portal with lots of flashy links. In this case, FFP2.com is unlikely a potential upgrade for FFP2.com.cn.

QS88.com sold for $3,159 and is already listed on the LVMI.com marketplace with a BIN price of 80,000 yuan (or about $12,000). QS may be an acronym for Quan Sheng (全胜=total victory), Qiao Shou (巧手=skillful hands), and Qing Song (轻松=effortless). 8 rhymes with Fa (发=making a fortune).

JS52.com sold for $2,247. JS52 .cn links to JS123-1 .com which is a betting site. In this case, JS52.com is unlikely a potential upgrade for JS52 .cn.

XJ33.com sold for $1,230 and is already listed with a BIN price of 28,880 yuan (about $4,300). XJ33 .cn appears to be a betting site but the brand may be Bet365, so XJ33.com is unlikely a potential upgrade for XJ33 .cn.

383K.com sold for $1,100. 383K .com.cn forwards to YA022 .com which looks like a lottery site, so 383K.com is unlikely a potential upgrade for 383K .com.cn.

ZZ22.com sold for $1,051. ZZ22.cn is a manufacturer of electronic devices such as inductors, electronic transformers, and filters. However, its brand is Fu He (富合) which apparently is unrelated to ZZ22.cn. Therefore, ZZ22.com is unlikely a potential upgrade for ZZ22.cn.

In these examples, I could not find any genuine end users in China for the .com domains as upgrades. However, it still should be helpful by showing that a developed .cn or .com.cn does not guarantee that there are desired end users for your .com domains. Further research is needed.

Post link: Reviewing 4-character domains sold in April

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Categories: News and Updates

Seattle business guilty of reverse domain name hijacking

Tue, 2020-05-26 16:48

Panelist calls the complaint “patently deficient.”

UDRP panelists usually don’t find reverse domain name hijacking if a Complainant represents themselves. But World Intellectual Property Organization panelist Scott Blackmer decided it was warranted in a recent case.

Structure Cellars, which operates a wine tasting room in Seattle, filed a complaint against HouseofPagne.com (short for Champagne).

The registrant of the domain says she registered it and pitched the Complainant on an idea for a business. The two didn’t end up partnering on the venture. There’s a bit of he said, she said and there might be a legitimate dispute outside of the scope of UDRP.

But that dispute doesn’t warrant a cybersquatting dispute.

Blackmer noted that, even without counsel, the Complainant should have realized it was filing a bad case:

Here, the Complaint is patently deficient. The Complainant has trademark applications, not registrations, and it would need proof to establish common law rights. The Complaint does not address the obvious problem that the Complainant’s business was launched months after the Respondent registered the Domain Name. It should have been clear that if (sic) would be necessary to establish the relationship between the parties, but no evidence was submitted on this point. The Complainant is not represented by legal counsel, but these are common-sense rather than highly technical issues, and the Center’s forms, Rules, and Overview provide accessible guidance on these points. The Respondent, who is also not represented by counsel, certainly grasped their implication when completing the Center’s form Response…

…The Complainant may have a business dispute with the Respondent, but the Complainant should not have pursued a remedy designed only to protect trademark rights when it was not prepared to prove that it has such rights and that the Respondent registered and used the Domain Name in contemplation of the Complainant’s trademark rights. This is so fundamental to the Policy that it must be considered irresponsible to ignore.

Post link: Seattle business guilty of reverse domain name hijacking

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One Word Domains – DNW Podcast #287

Tue, 2020-05-26 15:30

A tool to find one-word domains and thoughts about the state of the domain business.

This week I have a guest interview and some thoughts about the domain industry. For the guest segment, I speak with Steven Tey, a student who created OneWord.Domains to help people discover one-word domains that are available for registration. In addition to speaking with Steven, I give my take on the current state of the domain market, discuss domain name liquidation platforms, and share my frustrations with GoDaddy.

Also: Patents, reverse domain name hijacking, domain name surge

Sponsor: Donuts

Subscribe via Apple Podcasts to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, or click play above or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)

Post link: One Word Domains – DNW Podcast #287

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Categories: News and Updates

GoDaddy’s bold color choice has benefits

Tue, 2020-05-26 14:36

The color alone screams “GoDaddy” to me.

GoDaddy’s (NYSE: GDDY) new logo gave a lot of people pause last year. Is it a heart? Two eggs? An upside-down AirBnB logo? Part of the reproductive system?

But the boldest thing might have been the color. The bright aqua color stands out. It’s vivid. It’s bright. It can make your eyes hurt if you stare at it too long.

And yet.

And yet, the unique color choice means that when you see the color, you might associate it with GoDaddy. It’s not the popular green, red, and blue colors that make up so many other logos.

I was reminded of this the other day when I was on Facebook using a laptop. It’s a busy page, yet an ad in the column caught my eye:

It caught my eye because of the jarring color. I immediately thought “GoDaddy” before reading the ad.

Color alone is rarely unique enough to provide brand impressions. I’d argue GoDaddy’s aqua color does just that.

Post link: GoDaddy’s bold color choice has benefits

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Categories: News and Updates

Workforce.com: The danger of not owning the “best” domain for your company

Sat, 2020-05-23 15:59

Confusion when someone buys the better domain.

Workforce Software provides workforce management software using the domain name WorkforceSoftware.com.

For decades, the shorter Workforce.com domain was used by Workforce Magazine to deliver human resources news.

But last year, a competitor to Workforce Software acquired the publisher of Workforce Magazine. It then changed the use of Workforce.com from human resources news to promoting its own workforce management software, rebranded as Workforce.com.

Suddenly, Workforce Software had a big problem: confusion.

It didn’t have the best domain for its business, and now a competitor was using the best domain.

Workforce Software filed a cybersquatting complaint under UDRP against Workforce.com and lost.

The confusion is real. For about a minute while researching this case, I wondered if Workforce Software had acquired Workforce.com at the last minute. Take a look at their logos in the image. They both have lowercase logos with a blue icon in them. The icons are fairly similar but flipped.

This is not a case of cybersquatting, though. It’s another example of not owning the best domain for your company and having it come back to haunt you.

I usually tell people that if the better domain is currently in use in a non-confusing way, you’ll be OK registering the second-best domain. I urge caution when the best domain is just a parked page that might be sold to someone else.

But in this case, even though Workforce.com was being used in a non-infringing way, it was sold.

It reminds me of a similar issue a friend ran into. He registered a domain in the form exampleSoftware .com, just like this domain. Then someone bought example .com to market a sex toy. His friends called him up, saying they didn’t realize he had gotten into that business.

It will be interesting to see if Workforce Software takes this issue to the courts. While it’s not cybersquatting under UDRP, there might be a trademark issue. Then again, Workforce is a very generic word to use as a brand for workforce management software.

Post link: Workforce.com: The danger of not owning the “best” domain for your company

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More and more companies are using new TLDs

Fri, 2020-05-22 16:41

Registration numbers games are masking actual use.

Big companies might prefer .com. Most people might choose .com. But there’s another trend I’ve seen over the past year that shouldn’t be overlooked: more and more companies using new top level domains.

It’s a shame that some new TLD operators played games with registration numbers when new TLDs launched. The inevitable decline in registration numbers when those domains dropped is masking what I believe to be a steady increase in end users registering and using new TLDs.

I see this a lot at my PodcastGuests.com service. People choose domains like .show and .live for their podcast websites. I spoke to a podcast company the other day that uses a .audio domain. When I searched for virtual event companies this month, I saw domains ending in .events and .live.

What was once a once-a-month occurrence became once-a-week to now once-a-day.

So much has been lost in the debate over .com vs. new TLDs. .Com stalwarts said new TLDs didn’t have a place in the ecosystem. New TLD promoters said the domains were better than .com.

Neither is correct in 2020. The answer is somewhere in the middle.

Consider the millions of domain registrations this year. A business looks for its ideal domain. If it’s in the U.S., the registrant likely starts by looking for .com. If they don’t find what they want, they might consider an aftermarket domain. A subset of people decides to use a new TLD instead.

Thus, there is a growth curve for new TLDs. It’s not a hockey stick like some people predicted. But it’s there. Actual use by actual end users will increase over time. Slow and steady, but up and to the right.

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Categories: News and Updates

The preference for .com

Fri, 2020-05-22 13:11

No matter where you look, big companies tend to favor .com.

The other day I read an article about domains used by corporate users around the world. It just shows how important .com is as a global extension.

Yakup Hasan Küçük at Dofo recently analyzed the top 1,000 companies in the Crunchbase database. These companies come from the U.S., India, U.K., and many other countries. Küçük published his findings in the article “Domain Names of Crunchbase Top 1000 Companies“. This is what he found.

“When we look at their domain extension preferences, .com is the most preferred with 85% (850). The popular extension among startups, .io, follows .com with 31 domain names. .co is the third most popular with 19 domain names.”

This reminds me of my study of the top 100 internet companies in China in the last two years (2018 and 2019).

Note that Küçük’s study consists of companies in various fields but mine is about internet companies only. Even though direct comparison is not possible, I think these studies are still valuable in showing us the importance of .com.

Study Share of .com Crunchbase Top 1000 85% China Top 100 (internet) 2018 86% China Top 100 (internet) 2019 84%

As you can see, most top companies own .com domains and there is strong demand for them in China as well. If you own a .com domain, it may be perfect as an upgrade for a company in China. Therefore, end user research is very helpful. Some simple steps may go a long way. Read “Three steps to Chinese end user research” for details.

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Your domain name can hurt your credibility

Thu, 2020-05-21 20:01

It’s OK to not have the best domain. But at least choose a decent one.

We talk a lot about how a great domain name gives a company instant credibility.

As an example, entrepreneur Jason Calacanis recently said:

When people see a great domain name like robinhood.com or calm.com, this inspires people because it’s hard to get those domain names. It’s hard to have the one-word domain name and it makes you look like you have a serious brand.

I’d argue the inverse is also true: if you have a horrible brand, your business loses credibility.

There are plenty of good domains out there that businesses can acquire for a few thousand dollars. These are respectable, professional domains. They won’t give their users instant credibility like Calm.com and Inside.com do, but they also don’t look bad.

Then there are domains that make a company look fly-by-night.

I recently evaluated online event platforms (for something unrelated to domains). It’s imperative to choose an online event platform that won’t disappear the night before your event.

A lot of virtual event platforms are, not surprisingly, new. Some have chosen bad domains that make them hard to trust.

Consider Run The World. By all accounts, it has some great customers. It just raised $10 million.

Its domain name is RunTheWorld.today.

I don’t have a problem with companies using new top level domains. It can make sense. But taking a long name like this and tacking on two more syllables?

Other choices make more sense, like .live or .events.

I certainly scrutinized the company more given its domain choice. The social proof from its investors and customers was much more important given the domain.

Some other options are Crowdcast, which uses Crowdcast.io. That’s a pretty good company name. There’s also Hopin.to. I don’t love the fact that it’s on Tonga’s top level domain, but at least it plays well with the company name.

None of these companies need to use the domain events.com. But a bit more effort would go a long way.

Post link: Your domain name can hurt your credibility

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GoDaddy files customer support-related patent applications

Thu, 2020-05-21 17:05

Patents cover a better way to provide support.

GoDaddy (NYSE: GDDY) has filed a couple of patent applications (pdf, pdf) for an improved customer service experience. Whether or not you think it should be patentable, I sure wish companies would adopt this idea.

The patents have two main elements to them:

1. When someone is within their account at GoDaddy and needs to contact support, they can use a one-time passcode to validate with the customer service representative. The screen may display this one-time code or it could be texted or emailed to the customer. Ideally, they wouldn’t need to provide other supporting information to validate their identity to the representative.

2. When the user provides that code, the customer service representative will see the history of what the customer has been doing on the site prior to the support call. The patent gives an example of someone building a website and calling in for support.

My typical experience when calling a company for support goes something like this:

1. Enter my account number on the IVR

2. Answer an IVR question about what I’m calling about

3. Get transferred to live rep

4. Live rep asks me my account information AGAIN and what I’m calling about AGAIN

So GoDaddy’s system is an improvement, especially when you’re doing something like building a website.

As a GoDaddy customer, what I’d love to see is better logging. For example, why have the last three times I’ve added domains through the Domain Listing Service has the listing failed? I don’t even get an email from the company saying the process didn’t complete.

Post link: GoDaddy files customer support-related patent applications

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Reviewing 4-letter domains sold in April

Thu, 2020-05-21 13:40

Some of these four letter domains could have value in China.

Here are some 4-letter domains sold in April as reported by Namebio. I’ll try to look at them from a Chinese perspective, which hopefully will help you when researching Chinese buyers for your domains.

MDRP.com sold for $4,000. MDRP.cn is for sale at 5,888 yuan or about $883. The .com is more than 4X the price of the .cn. MDRP can be an acronym for Mo Deng Ru Pin (摩登乳品=modern milk products) and many more Pinyin phrases.

CSSM.com sold for $1,800. CSSM.com.cn is an online magazine organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology, and CSSM is the acronym for “China Soft Science Magazine”. In this case, the domain matches the name of the magazine. CSSM can also be an acronym for Chang Su Shang Mao (畅速商贸=smooth and fast trades) and many more Pinyin phrases.

NLLW.com sold for $1,050. When you see a Chinese site filled with contents, do not immediately assume you have found an end user who should upgrade to your domain. The contents may not be genuine. In the case of NLLW.com.cn, it appears to be an education-related site but the message at the bottom of the page indicates the contents are taken from other online sources and the domain is actually for sale.

GMTS.com sold for $1,055. GMTS.cn appears to be a developed site but I could not see any contents. The HTML source of the page gives mixed signals: the page description is about sports games but most of the content is about electronic parts. So, I would not assume that this is a genuine end user.

GMTS .com.cn is a simple site titled “Lottery Industry Supervision Bureau”. However, it has only a menu filled with links to games and betting sites built on .co domains such as A668 .co, M668 .co, and C668 .co. The “668” here rhymes with Lu Lu Fa (路路发=make a fortune in every path you take), so it is quite appropriate for betting sites. Again, I would not assume this is a genuine end user.

MYPX.com sold for $3,605. MYPX.cn is a developed site by Xin Fang Xiang (新方向) to provide training for women interested in developing a career in child care. The domain and the company name do not seem to match, so I would not assume MYPX.com is a natural upgrade for the MYPX.cn owner. MYPX can also be an acronym for Mei Yu Pi Xie (美誉皮鞋=reputable shoes) and many more Pinyin phrases.

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Categories: News and Updates

New site shows available one-word domain names

Wed, 2020-05-20 16:22

There aren’t many available, it turns out.

OneWord.Domains shows available one word domain names.

A new website helps people find available one-word domain names—and proves just how rare they are in popular top level domains.

Steven Tey, a data science student at the Minerva Schools at Keck Graduate Institute, launched OneWord.Domains to show available one-word domains in a handful of popular extensions.

The site currently shows domains in .ai, .app, .co, .com and .io.

While the site certainly identifies some great domains, there is a big problem: many of the domains have registry premiums.

For example, Million.co is an excellent domain and is available for registration. But it has a registry premium on it and will set you back a few thousand dollars to add it to your portfolio.

You can register .io and .ai domains that are on the site at regular rates, but you’ll notice a dearth of good names.

In many ways, rather than helping you find good domains to register, the site is another reminder of how difficult it is to find great domains to register. Maybe a two-word domains site would be more helpful.

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