News and Updates

Why Squadhelp’s new white label marketplace is worth a look

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 2020-07-13 16:37

A lot is going on under the hood with Squadhelp’s new marketplace option.

Squadhelp’s white label domain marketplace option is about more than creating a marketplace.

SquadHelp announced its new white label marketplace option today. It enables domain investors to create their own marketplace of domain names.

I wasn’t excited when I first read about this. There are several options out there for creating a marketplace for your domains. I’ve never been a fan of this because I find it unlikely that someone will land on your marketplace, search for a domain, and buy it.

But Squadhelp buries the lede with its announcement. What the white label marketplace really lets you do is set up great landing pages for your domains with added features and low commissions.

When you add domains to your white label marketplace through Squadhelp, you get:

  1. A good landing page for your domain. See OnshoreSupport.com for an example.
  2. 24/7 live chat and phone support on that landing page. I think this is huge. Buyers with questions can chat with a human to resolve any questions.
  3. Squadhelp remarkets your domains to people who land on them through retargeting ads across the web.
  4. Add logos to your domains for $5.  (A logo is required to get remarketing. Logos are free if they are approved as premium domains in Squadhelp’s marketplace.)
  5. 7.5% sales commission.

I talked about this new platform and how domainers can use Squadhelp’s tools with Squadhelp CEO Darpan Munjal on this week’s DNW Podcast.

You can see the marketplace I set up here.

 

 

Post link: Why Squadhelp’s new white label marketplace is worth a look

© DomainNameWire.com 2020. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact editor (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

No related posts.

Categories: News and Updates

Sell more domains with a crowd – DNW Podcast #294

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 2020-07-13 15:30

Squadhelp is becoming a formidable player in the domain aftermarket.

It’s one thing to list your brandable domains for sale. It’s another thing to list them for sale and have people suggest them to end users at the exact moment they’re searching for a name. That’s one of the many benefits of Squadhelp, a crowd-sourced naming service. On today’s show, Squadhelp CEO Darpan Munjal explains how the platform works and talks about the company’s new white label domain marketplace system. You can see the white label marketplace I created here.

Also: Walmart’s odd domain registrations, Verisign takes action against Covid-19 domains, new Sedo brokerage tool and more.

Sponsor: DAN.com

Subscribe via Apple Podcasts to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, or click play above or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)

Post link: Sell more domains with a crowd – DNW Podcast #294

© DomainNameWire.com 2020. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact editor (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Domain investing with Shane Cultra – DNW Podcast #164
  2. 2019 Predictions – DNW Podcast #218
  3. Rick Schwartz – DNW Podcast #225
Categories: News and Updates

Why You Shouldn't Believe Network Speed Tests

Domain industry news - Sun, 2020-07-12 21:28

The media is filled with hyperbolic claims that "Our network is the fastest!"

And there are many so-called "Speed Test" tools available on the Internet. Most are easily run in a web browser.

Should you trust those tools?

Not really.

The popular speed testing tools provide a very narrow and limited measure of network "speed."

It is quite possible that a network that is rated as "fast" could actually deliver poor results to many applications.

Why is this so?

What's In Those Speed Tests?

Most speed test tools on the Internet run a limited regime of tests:

  • ICMP Echo/Reply ("ping") to measure round-trip time (although most tests are unclear whether they are reporting round-trip time or dividing by two to estimate one-way latency.)
  • HTTP GET (download) and PUT (upload) to measure TCP bandwidth.

Some more sophisticated tools may add things like:

  • Traceroute (properly done with UDP packets, improperly done using ICMP Echo packets)
  • DNS queries

Some speed test tools use IPv4, some use IPv6, some use whatever the underlying web browser and IP stack chooses.

Sounds Good, So What's Wrong With 'Em?

Network performance is highly related to the way that the devices on a network converse with one another.

For example:

  • Does the application software (and its server) use UDP or TCP?

    UDP is vulnerable to many network phenomena such as IP fragmentation, highly variable latency/jitter, packet loss, or alteration of the sequence of packets (i.e., the sender sends packets A, B, and C, the receiver gets them in the order B, C, A.), etc.

    TCP, on the other hand, although reliable, may withhold delivering data to the receiver while it internally tries to deal with packet losses, changes in end-to-end latency, and network congestion.

  • Does the application's data have real-time constraints? For example, voice or video conferencing applications have very tight time constraints else the images may break up, freeze or words be lost.
  • How big are the chunks of data being sent? Larger data, particularly very large high-definition video, is more vulnerable to loss on the network, transient congestion problems, or IP fragmentation issues than are small data packets.

The bandwidth number generated by most speed test tools is based on World-Wide-Web HTTP GET (upload) and HTTP POST (download) transactions. These are bulk transfers of large amounts of data over TCP connections.

Bandwidth numbers based on TCP bulk transfers tend to be good indicators of how long it may take to download a large web page. But those numbers can be weak indicators of performance for more interactive applications (e.g. Zoom).

Moreover, TCP tries to be a good citizen on the network by trying hard to avoid contributing to network congestion. TCP contains several algorithms that kick in when a new connection is started and when congestion is perceived. These algorithms cause the sending TCP stack to reduce its transmission rate and slowly creep back up to full speed. This means that each new TCP connection begins with a "slow start." In addition, any lost packets or changes in perceived round-trip time may send the sending TCP stack into its congestion avoidance regime during which traffic flows will be reduced.

Modern web pages tend to be filled with large numbers of subsidiary references. Each of those tends to engender a Domain Name System lookup (UDP) and a fresh TCP connection (each with its own slow start penalty.) As a consequence, modern web page performance is often not so much limited by network bandwidth but more by protocol algorithms and network round-trip times.

So What Do We Really Need?

Unfortunately, a full measure of the quality and speed of a network path includes a large number of often obtuse numbers.

  • Whether the path contains parallel elements due to load balancing or bonding of physical links. (In other words, it is good to know whether all the traffic follows the same path or whether it is divided among multiple paths with possibly quite different characteristics.)
  • Whether the network path is symmetrical or whether each direction takes a different route. (This is very common.)
  • Path MTU (Maximum Transmission Unit for the entire one-way path — a separate value is needed for each direction.)
  • End-to-end latency, and often, more importantly, a statistical measure of the packet-to-packet variation of that delay, often called "jitter."
  • Packet loss rates and a measure of whether that loss occurs continuously or in bursts. (This is particularly important on paths that include technologies subject to outside interference and noise such as wireless links.)
  • Buffering along the path (in other words, whether the path may suffer from "bufferbloat".)
  • Packet re-sequencing rates and a measure of whether that is burst behavior or continuous.
  • Whether there are "hidden" proxy devices (most likely HTTP/HTTPS or SIP proxies) that are relaying the traffic.
  • Whether there are any rate limiters or data quotas on the path.
What Can A User Do?

Users are somewhat limited in their ability to control protocols and applications.

The user can check the following things:

  • If using a wi-fi network at home or work in conjunction with Bluetooth, make sure that you are attached to the wi-fi on the 2.4Ghz band. Many user devices have only one radio. If that device is connected to wi-fi in the 5Ghz band, then that radio is being rapidly switched between Bluetooth on the 2.4Ghz band and wi-fi on the 5Ghz band. That's a recipe for generating destructive packet loss and jitter.
  • Make sure your home wi-fi and router devices have some of the new anti-bufferbloat code. See What Can I Do About Bufferbloat?
  • Be aware when you may be sharing your network resources with other users or other applications.
What Tools Do Developers Have To Make Sure Applications Behave Well Under Real-Life Conditions? Enter the Network Emulator.

Speed test tools tend to give an optimistic report of how a network behaves for a highly constrained number of applications. Similarly, many network developers test their code only under optimal laboratory conditions.

There are tools available to developers so that they can assure that their code and products are robust and behave well in the face of inevitable sub-optimal network conditions.

Most of these tools come under the heading of "network emulators." These effectively act as a bothersome man-in-the-middle, delaying some packets, tossing others, perhaps re-sequencing packets, or even duplicating them.

Network Emulators come in a variety of capabilities and accuracies:

  • Simple emulators are built into some mobile phones.
  • There are a couple of open-source packages that typically exist as kernel modules for Linux or FreeBSD. These usually must be used through an arcane command-line interface. And their accuracy can vary wildly depending on the underlying hardware.
  • There are external devices that are inserted into an Ethernet link (like one would insert an Ethernet switch.) These devices tend to have better accuracy and performance and often have web-based graphical user interfaces. IWL's KMAX is in this category.

There are also mathematical emulators. Those are more for those who are designing large networks and want to perform queueing theory analysis of how that network might perform if new links are added or removed.

This post was originally published on IWL.

Written by Karl Auerbach, Chief Technical Officer at InterWorking Labs

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Broadband

Categories: News and Updates

Addressing Anticompetitive Behavior in Internet Standards Bodies

Domain industry news - Sun, 2020-07-12 01:08

A significant focus is emerging today on the anticompetitive behaviour of Silicon Valley companies directed at dominating critical sectors of the on-line marketplace, and a U.S. Congressional hearing is scheduled. Such practices can be pursued in many ways. One of the more elusive, but very effective anticompetitive playbooks — known legally as the "antitrust conspiracy” — can occur in internet standards bodies. Where dominating markets with running code is a way of life, internet standards bodies are invaluable strategic instruments.

Concerns about antitrust conspiracies have been around a long time and part of the fabric of most modern economies. In the U.S., the origins of antitrust conspiracy law extend back to the Sherman Act passed in 1890 which makes it illegal for competitors to make agreements with each other that would limit competition. The U.S. Dept. of Justice recognizes three sub-types: price-fixing, bid-rigging, and market allocation. It is the antitrust market allocation conspiracy playbook that typically gets manifested in standards bodies and treated as an economic crime that harms innovation and the dynamics of a free market economy.

All internet standards setting organizations potentially have this kind of antitrust exposure. As the ITU 2014 Manual on competition law and standards notes, "competition law, also referred to as 'antitrust' or 'anti-monopoly' law, is a form of market regulation that aims to create a competitive business environment through the prohibition of conduct that restricts access to a market or otherwise negatively affects domestic or international trade." The most prominent provisions and active enforcement arise under treaty instruments and Directives in Europe and several Antitrust Acts in the U.S. In addition, judicial determinations emerging from litigating antitrust "cases in controversy" help amplify and clarify the statutory and regulatory provisions. A landmark U.S. Federal case arose almost a decade ago and dealt squarely with antitrust market allocation conspiracies in internet standards bodies.

Standards making activities are, by definition, aimed at agreeing on specifications where implementation will exclude non-compliant parties. However, as a practical matter, only certain kinds of standards making conduct is unlawful, such as 1) prohibitions on adopting competing standards, 2) excluding technologies and marketplace participants, or 3) colluding on dominating the marketplace. All the parties engaged in the activity, whether companies or individuals, can be culpable in abetting the restraints — notably including the standards body itself.

This article is the first in a series and describes the relevant antitrust conspiracy law, how it appeared and evolved in internet standards bodies, the ensuing litigation, and steps that have been taken to diminish the risk of the behavior occurring. It also suggests the need for a global dialogue on the topic.

1. Evolution of Standards Bodies and Relevant Antitrust Law

In the U.S., antitrust conspiracies to restrain trade within industry standards groups have been prohibited for many decades through Federal Trade Commission Act provisions. Some of the most famous cases involved company strategies to create standards groups whose sole purpose was to specify and approve only the company's products.

However, anticompetitive conspiracy conduct in internet standards bodies was never relevant until the 1990s. Until that point in history, the network services and products offered to the public were commonly provided through national monopoly arrangements — in many cases by agencies of government that provided the product or service. The associated standards bodies were governmental or intergovernmental in nature. In other cases, the activities were undertaken through national governmental organizations that effectively provided antitrust liability protection for industry participants.

It wasn't until the mid-1990s that internet standards bodies free from government oversight emerged that even enabled antitrust conspiracies to occur. One of the earliest and most prominent of the new bodies was the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), which was divested from its previous U.S. government agency educational and research sponsorship. The IETF's origins, combined with the lack of definitive participant affiliations which had previously served it well as an academic activity, gave rise to potential antitrust conspiracy behavior as the work became increasingly valuable in the commercial marketplace. At that point, the Internet Society purchased substantial antitrust litigation insurance protection for those engaged in IETF standards decision-making activities in conjunction with the Society assuming IPR responsibility for its standards.

The IETF was among dozens of new private internet industry standards bodies that emerged during the 1990s driven by two powerful factors: 1) a rapidly expanding marketplace that necessitated more highly specialized industry standards bodies, and 2) targeted "strategic participation" by companies in those specialized markets. Unfortunately, such strategic participation has often led to decision-making positions in standards bodies being held by funded technical assets — increasing the risk of antitrust conspiracies.

The landmark decision of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in 2000 that declared the term "internet" generic and available for anyone to use, also helped propel a broad diversity of standards activities.

A realization of these fundamental changes in internet standards activities during the 1990s led to the creation of the Global Standards Collaboration (GSC) organization — which met annually to treat major issues before internet standards bodies. It also brought together the legal counsel from the different bodies to treat growing concerns such as antitrust behavior.

As the specialized standards bodies continued to expand along with the ICT market, a series of high-profile anticompetitive abuses gave rise to an array of FTC actions and judicial decisions that revealed the antitrust risks associated with manipulating standards-setting processes. However, it was not until 2011 that the world of antitrust conspiracy law and internet standards bodies changed forever.

2. Non-profit Standards Bodies Culpable for Antitrust Conspiracies

In 2011, a small provider of wireless internet-based location solutions sued several network technology giants and the supporting non-profit standards body in U.S. Federal Court. TruePosition Technologies alleged that three large equipment companies plus the standards bodies "conspired to exclude its positioning technology...from standards promulgated" by the bodies. Three years and ten days later, after 313 filed documents in the case, and millions of dollars of legal fees, the action ended with a settlement agreement. The court's TruePosition Decision found that the ETSI (European Telecommunications Standards Institute) incorporated in France as a non-profit body, by supporting the 3GPP standards work had plausibly "joined the alleged [antitrust] conspiracy."

A summary of the key mandates of the TruePosition Decision are:

  1. Standards bodies must actively police the actions of their committees to prevent legitimate, pro-competitive standard setting from being subverted to private agendas of their participants
  2. Standards Bodies should adopt antitrust and intellectual property policies to be signed by authorized signatories of all participants and reiterated at every meeting
  3. Nonprofit standards associations are liable when members act in their name, even if the organization is not involved in standard setting
  4. When volunteers are placed in standards leadership positions, nonprofit organizations must establish clear terms of reference for all leadership positions and make it clear where the leader's authority begins and ends
  5. It is essential to formulate — and to train leaders regarding — policies governing conflicts of interest, ethics, gratuities, anti-corruption principles, and related matters

After the TruePosition Decision, most internet standards bodies began working to implement the five mandates as best practices to identify and stop antitrust conspiracies.

3. Antitrust Conspiracy Law Best Practices

In 2014, the Director of the ITU Telecommunication Standardization Bureau which assumed responsibility for the Global Standards Collaboration activity, commissioned a compendium drawing from the TruePosition DecisionUnderstanding patents, competition & standardization in an interconnected world. It perhaps remains as the most comprehensive treatment of the subject. The document notes that there are more than 800 organizations "developing, promoting or supporting ICT standards," and articulates the basic purpose of competition law applicable to them.

Competition law and its associated monitoring and enforcement activities serve three main purposes: 1) prohibiting agreements, collaborations or practices between market players which may restrict free trading or competition between businesses; 2) prohibiting abusive conduct by a dominant market player; and 3) monitoring market concentration and mergers.

The Manual points to ETSI's Guidelines for Antitrust Compliance as a particularly useful model for standards organizations. In addition to dealing with anticompetitive IPR practices, the Guidelines proscribe discussions concerning:

  • "preventing anybody from gaining access to any market or customer for goods and services;
  • refusals to deal or do business with competitors, vendors or suppliers
  • [and that] even the appearance of any discussion, communication or exchange of information that appears to be leading to restraints on competition of any kind should be carefully avoided."

The Guidelines — which are prominent on ETSI's website and referenced in every meeting agenda and by chairs at the outset of every meeting — also contain two specific, related mandates for participants:

C.4.3 In the event that a participant becomes aware of any discussion, communication or exchange of information that appears to be leading to restraints on competition of any kind, such participant should raise the issue, seek to terminate such discussion, communication or exchange of information or separate from it.

CC.5.3 Nobody should be coerced to adopt any ETSI document produced as the result of an ETSI Work Item (i.e., ETSI Standard, European Standard, ETSI Group Specification, ETSI Technical Specification, ETSI Technical Report, ETSI Guide or ETSI Special Report), nor should any efforts be undertaken that are intended to prevent the manufacture, sale, or supply of any product or services not conforming to any such adopted ETSI document.

In addition to the ITU and ETSI, most other internet standards bodies have dedicated antitrust conspiracy related materials and include, for example: 3GPP, Bluetooth SIG, Broadband Forum, CA/Browser Forum, CableLabs, GSMA, IEEE, ISO, MEF, OASIS, OMA, OMG, W3C, ZigBee Alliance. Taken as a whole, this material effectively constitutes best practice for internet standards bodies for this kind of antitrust behaviour.

Almost all internet standards bodies have taken definitive steps to implement the five TruePosition mandates to avoid antitrust conspiracy culpability. Notable exceptions are the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), the IETF Trust LLC, the IETF Administration LLC, the Internet Architecture Board (IAB), and the Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA). Although all of these bodies have treated IPR and other conduct with a Note Well, there are no apparent policies or requirements dealing with antitrust conspiracy anywhere in their organizational materials except for an IAB Conflict of Interest Policy — which is not the same. The IETF antitrust conspiracy risk is also significantly amplified by the ability of any party to participate in its standards making processes — especially the lists which drive much of the work — without any disclosure of who they represent or how they are funded or consideration of the anticompetitive effects. The one time that treatment of the antitrust conspiracy topic was considered by the IETF in 2012, it consisted of a short email discussion list, a Birds of a Feather (BOF) session, and a slide presentation. Although a web page for continuing education and material was proposed, nothing further was done.

4. Focus on Antitrust Conspiracy in the Internet Marketplace Has Significantly Increased

Over the past several years, significant developments have occurred in both technical and legal domains. The developments are game-changers worth significant consideration by all internet standards bodies.

Competition authorities in the U.S. and Europe have voiced increasing concern about anti-competitive conduct and concentration in the network services industry — including the behaviour of individual actors. The concern is more than just hypothetical. The legal scholar and counsel who produced the IETF 2012 BOF presentation has recently amplified on new antitrust concerns and needs. The European Commission has become especially active over the past several years. The respected law firm of Skadden Arps, recently published a special publication on the subject, noting:

Antitrust enforcers in the United States and European Union (EU) remained active in 2019, and recent developments at the Department of Justice (DOJ), Federal Trade Commission (FTC), state attorneys general (AG) offices and EU agencies signal even greater levels of activity in 2020. The common theme is increased attention to high-tech industries and digital markets, which are expected to face heightened scrutiny.

The IETF cluster of bodies is especially vulnerable because of inattention to process transparency, conflicts of interest, and anticompetitive effects. The Glassey Complaint in U.S. Federal Court several years ago emerged from these concerns and noted that even the simple inclusion of a product specification in an IETF standard was worth 2 to 4 million dollars.

Recently, the critical internet standards venues such as the CA/Browser Forum have substantially increased their attention to antitrust conspiracy exposure by adopting revised bylaws and statements which are read at each meeting similar to ETSI. Concerns over the need for the IETF to address this kind of antitrust behaviour were raised at a Nov 2019 meeting BOF and repeated at the March 2020 meeting open mike session. However, when the question "what is the IETF LLC doing to ensure it complies with antitrust laws" was asked, the reply was, "we have looked at whether we want to do anything about antitrust...but there was nothing to do." Today, no internet standards body can afford to dismiss the TruePosition mandates on antitrust behavior with "nothing to do." Simply proffering a Mission Statement is not enough.

5. Reducing Antitrust Conspiracy Risks

There is now a very significantly increased focus by competition authorities worldwide on antitrust conspiracies in internet standards activities to constrain market competition. The challenges are being faced by everybody today.

Hundreds, if not thousands of companies and ad-hoc non-profit organizations, have emerged in the ecosystem who are strongly incentivised to pursue antitrust conspiracy tactics in and among internet standards bodies to advance diverse agendas. Internet standards bodies are potentially being pitted against another to prevent competition. As the TruePosition court admonished — standards bodies must actively police the actions of their committees to prevent legitimate, pro-competitive standard setting from being subverted to private agendas of their participants.

There is an urgent need for global collaboration among internet standards bodies to: 1) bring together experiences among all the interested parties, 2) better understand the steps and status being taken by different internet standards bodies to implement and update the TruePosition mandates, and 3) get agreement on specific, actionable antitrust conspiracy mitigation guidelines for everyone in all the diverse internet standards bodies today.

Written by Anthony Rutkowski, Principal, Netmagic Associates LLC

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Internet Governance, Policy & Regulation

Categories: News and Updates

Did Broadband Deregulation Save the Internet?

Domain industry news - Sun, 2020-07-12 00:33

Something has been bothering me for several months, and that usually manifests in a blog at some point. During the COVID-19 crisis, the FCC and big ISPs have repeatedly said that the only reason our networks weathered the increased traffic during the pandemic was due to the FCC's repeal of net neutrality and deregulation of the broadband industry. Nothing could be further from the truth.

The big increase in broadband traffic was largely a non-event for big ISPs. Networks only get under real stress during the busiest times of the day. It's during these busy hours when network performance collapses due to networks being overloaded. There was a big increase in overall Internet traffic during the pandemic, but the busy hour was barely affected. The busy hour for the Internet as a whole is mid-evenings when the greatest number of homes are watching video at the same time. Every carrier that discussed the impact of COVID-19 said that the web traffic during the evening busy-hour didn't change during the pandemic. What changed was a lot more usage during the daytime as students took school classes from home, and employees worked from home. Daytime traffic increased, but it never grew to be greater than the evening traffic. As surprising as that might seem to the average person, ISP networks were never in any danger of crashing — they just got busier than normal during the middle of the day, but not so busy as to threaten any Internet crashes. The big ISPs are crowing about weathering the storm when their networks were not in any serious peril.

It's ironic to see the big ISPs taking a victory lap about their performance during the pandemic because the pandemic shined a light on ISP failures.

  • First, the pandemic reminded America that there are tens of millions of rural homes that don't have good broadband. For years the ISPs argued that they didn't invest in rural America because they were unwilling to invest in an over-regulated environment. The big ISPs all promised they would increase investment and hire more workers if they were deregulated. That was an obvious lie, since the big ISPs like Comcast and AT&T have cut investments since the net neutrality appeal, and collectively the big ISPs have laid off nearly 100,000 workers since then. The fact is that the big ISPs haven't invested in rural broadband in decades, and even 100% deregulation is not enough incentive for them to do so. The big ISPs wrote off rural America many years ago, so any statements they make to the contrary are purely rhetoric and lobbying.
  • The pandemic also highlighted the stingy and inadequate upload speeds that most big ISPs offer. This is the broadband crisis that arose during the pandemic that the big ISPs aren't talking about. Many urban homes that thought they had good broadband were surprised when they had trouble moving the office and school to their homes. The problem was not with download speeds, but with the upload speeds needed to connect to school and work servers and to talk all day on video chat platforms — activities that rely on a solid and reliable upload speed. Homes have reacted by migrating to fiber when it is available. The number of households that subscribe to gigabit broadband doubled from December 2019 to the end of March 2020.

The big ISPs and the FCC have also made big political hay during the Keep America Connected Pledge crisis, where ISPs promised not to disconnect homes for non-payment during the pandemic. I'm pretty sure the ISPs will soon go silent on that topic because soon the other shoe is going to drop as the ISPs expect homes to catch up on those 'excused' missed payments if they want to keep their home broadband. It's likely that millions of homes that ran out of money due to losing their jobs will soon be labeled as deadbeats by the ISPs and will not be let back onto the broadband networks until they pay their outstanding balance, including late fees and other charges.

The shame of the Keep America Connected Pledge was that it had to be voluntary because the FCC destroyed its ability to regulate ISPs in any way. The FCC has no tools left in the regulatory quiver to deal with the pandemic after it killed Title II regulation of broadband.

I find it irksome to watch an industry that completely won the regulatory battle keep acting like it is under siege. The big ISP lobbyists won completely and got the FCC to neuter itself, and yet the big ISPs miss no opportunity to keep making the same false claims they used to win the regulation fight.

It's fairly obvious that the big ISPs are already positioning themselves to fight off the time when the regulatory pendulum swings the other way. History has shown us that monopoly overreach always leads to a public reaction that demands stronger regulation. It's in the nature of all monopolies to fight against regulation — but you'd think the ISP industry could come up with something new rather than to repeat the same lame arguments they've been making for the last decade about how overregulation is killing them.

Written by Doug Dawson, President at CCG Consulting

Follow CircleID on Twitter

More under: Access Providers, Broadband, Coronavirus, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation

Categories: News and Updates

NamesCon Registration Prices go Up Tomorrorow

Domain Name News - Sat, 2013-11-30 18:57

What’s the perfect thing to do after celebrating Thanksgiving with your family? Get right back to work and plan for the new year. And to get into the domaining mood right in the new year, what’s better than a domain industry conference at a low price? Today’s the last day to get your NamesCon tickets for the event from January 13th to 15th in Las Vegas, NV for $199 + fees. Fees double tomorrow to $399.

Richard Lau, the organizer of the event told DNN: “We are at over 200 attendees already and expect to hit more than 400 at the conference. The opening party on Monday (6:30pm – 9pm) will be hosted by .XYZ at the Tropicana, and the Tuesday night party will be at the Havana Room at the Tropicana from 8pm-midnight.

With hotel prices as low of $79 a night +$10 resort fee at the Tropicana right on the strip this ‘no meal’ conference is shaping up to be the event for the industry in 2014.

The event has already attracted sponsors like:

Further sponsorships are available.

Keynote speakers are:

If you need another reason to attend – you even meet DomainNameNews in person there :)

Related posts:

Categories: News and Updates

.DE Registry to add Redemption Grace Period (DENIC)

Domain Name News - Tue, 2013-11-26 19:49

As of December 3rd, 2013, DENIC, the operator of the .DE ccTLD will also introduce a Redemption Grace Period (RGP) that allows the original domain owner to recover their expired domain for up to 30 days after the expiry, the same as for gTLDs.

See the full press release after the jump.

Redemption Grace Period for .DE name space kicking off in early December

New cooling off phase to prevent unintentional domain loss

Effective 3 December 2013, the managing organization and central registry operator of the .DE top level domain, DENIC, will launch a dedicated cooling-off service (called Redemption Grace Period – RGP) which shall apply for all second-level domain names in the .DE name space. This procedure shall protect registrants against an unintentional loss of their domain(s), as a result of accidental deletion.

Under the RGP scheme, .DE domain names shall no longer be irretrievably lost, following deletion, but instead initially enter a subsequent 30-day cooling-off phase, during which they may solely be re- registered on behalf of their former registrant(s).

RGP cooling-off provisions shall allow former registrants to redeem registration of the subject domain names, by having recourse to the related Restore service, through a registrar. Only if no redemption is requested, during the 30-day RGP phase, the relevant domain names shall become available for registration by any interested party again. At the time being, similar regulations are applied by other top level domain registries already.

Registrars redeeming a deleted .DE domain name for the original registrant will have to pay a Restore fee and may pass on the related costings.

Deleted .DE domain names placed in cooling off, from RGP implementation, will be earmarked by a redemption period status in the DENIC lookup services (whois) accessible at www.denic.de.

As a consequence of the above measures, the current DENIC .DE domain guidelines shall be superseded by new, amended ones from the date of RGP launch, i.e. 3 December 2013, which shall then be permanently published at http://www.denic.de/en/domains/general-information/domain- guidelines.html.

Related posts:

Categories: News and Updates

Andee Hill forms EscrowHill.com backed by Gregg McNair

Domain Name News - Mon, 2013-11-25 16:00

Andee Hill, who recently left Escrow.com where she was Director of Business Development, has created a new licensed escrow company, Escrow Hill Limited with he backing of entrepreneur Gregg McNair.

 

“When Andee told me she was thinking about forming her own escrow business I was immediately enthusiastic. I have a reputation of connecting some of the best people in our industry and Andee is at the top both professionally and as an amazing human being,” McNair said.

 

EscrowHill.com’s team includes Ryan Bogue as General Manager and Donald Hendrickson as Operations Manager. Both have worked in the business of online escrow under Hill’s direction for over fifteen years combined. Together with Hill’s experience the new team offers over thirty years of online escrow experience!

“During my fifteen years in this business, I have handled just about every aspect of online escrow. Regardless of my title, I have always known that understanding the client’s needs and providing excellent and secure service is invaluable. I have been fortunate to work with the industry innovator from day one. I have seen what works and what doesn’t. I have been even more fortunate to have created great relationships and trust with industry leaders. At EscrowHill.com I know I can do an even better job,” Hill said.

“Gregg has earned a strong reputation for honesty, integrity and for successfully making businesses work. He also has incredible enthusiasm and a heart for helping others. All are key factors in me wanting Gregg to support my endeavor at EscrowHill.com,” Hill continued.

McNair has assumed the non-operational role of Chairman, supporting Hill and her team with whatever it takes to build the best escrow business on the planet.

Marco Rinaudo, Founder and CEO of domain registrar Internet.bs, another one of Gregg McNairs investments,  has been appointed CTO of EscrowHill.com. Rinaudo, who has been a leader in the international hosting and registrar space since 1995, said, “EscrowHill.com is formed and supported by the very best people in the industry. Our team has built the most sophisticated on-line internet escrow platform, fully automated and with more advanced security features than any other.

See the full press release after the jump.

Andee Hill forms EscrowHill.com

AUCKLAND NZ: One aspect of the domain space that bridges the whole industry is that of escrow; and the one person better known than any other in that context is the former Director of Business Development at Escrow.com, Ms. Andee Hill.

Ms. Hill has established the licensed international escrow enterprise, Escrow Hill Limited with the backing of long time friend and industry entrepreneur, Gregg McNair.

“When Andee told me she was thinking about forming her own escrow business I was immediately enthusiastic. I have a reputation of connecting some of the best people in our industry and Andee is at the top both professionally and as an amazing human being,” McNair said.

EscrowHill.com’s dream team includes Ryan Bogue as General Manager and Donald Hendrickson as Operations Manager. Both have worked in the business of online escrow under Hill’s direction for over fifteen years combined. Together with Hill’s experience the new team offers over thirty years of online escrow experience!

The domain industry is undergoing incredible change and EscrowHill.com is positioned to provide secure, yet flexible, state of the art products and services. EscrowHill.com will be able to meet the needs of both past and future generations of domain buyers, brokers and sellers. Hill’s reputation as an honest, discreet and hard working professional will now aspire to a new level.

“During my fifteen years in this business, I have handled just about every aspect of online escrow. Regardless of my title, I have always known that understanding the client’s needs and providing excellent and secure service is invaluable. I have been fortunate to work with the industry innovator from day one. I have seen what works and what doesn’t. I have been even more fortunate to have created great relationships and trust with industry leaders. At EscrowHill.com I know I can do an even better job,” Hill said.

“Gregg has earned a strong reputation for honesty, integrity and for successfully making businesses work. He also has incredible enthusiasm and a heart for helping others. All are key factors in me wanting Gregg
to support my endeavor at EscrowHill.com,” Hill continued.

McNair has assumed the non-operational role of Chairman, supporting Hill and her team with whatever it takes to build the best escrow business on the planet.

Marco Rinaudo, Founder and CEO of Internet.bs has been appointed CTO of EscrowHill.com. Rinaudo, who has been a leader in the international hosting and registrar space since 1995, said, “EscrowHill.com is formed and supported by the very best people in the industry. Our team has built the most sophisticated on-line internet escrow platform, fully automated and with more advanced security features than any other.

Related posts:

Categories: News and Updates

Inaugural Heritage Auctions Domain Event in New York City – Live Results

Domain Name News - Thu, 2013-11-21 23:55

We were will be live blogging the results of the inaugural Heritage Auctions Domain Event in New York City today. There are no guarantees that this list is correct or complete as this are not official or officially approved results.

The auction sold 26 out of the 68 domains for a total of $419,970. Domains that did not sell in the live auction will be available on Heritage Auction’s website for two weeks at their reserve price as a Buy it Now price.

The top 5 sales of this auction were:

  1. XZ.com for $138,000
  2. Animation.com for $112,125
  3. Hemisphere.com for $34,500
  4. AIE.com for $23,000, BusinessPhone.com for $23,000
  5. Numismatics.com for $17,250

Please note that all domains occur a 15% bidder premium, noted in our total and in the last column of the table below. See the full live blogged results after the jump.

 

Lot #Domain NameReserveSold?Sale PricePrice w/ Commission 87001DupontCircle.com$7,000SOLD$7,000$8,050.00 87002OJX.comno reserveSOLD$3,666$4,215.90 87003CoinCompany.comno reserveSOLD$1,600$1,840.00 87004DoctorateDegree.com$10,000SOLD$11,500.00 87005ChicagoWine.comno reservepass 87006Animation.com$95,000SOLD$97,500$112,125.00 87007KCY.com$7,000pass 87008FXTrading.com$25,000pass 87009SellShort.com$6,000SOLD$6,000$6,900.00 87010Dayton.com$95,000pass 87011Coins.ca$35,000pass 87012Comics.ca$20,000pass 87013AIE.com$20,000SOLD$20,000$23,000.00 87014ZQF.comno reserveSOLD$3750$4,312.50 87015EqualRights.com$15,000pass 87016DVDs.com$50,000pass 87017CommercialArt.com$3,888pass 87018Burbank.net$5,000pass 87019FFQ.com$3,500SOLD$5,000$5,750.00 87020Numismatics.com$15,000SOLD$15,000$17,250.00 87021Charge.me$3,000pass 87022BusinessPhones.com$20,000SOLD$20,000$23,000.00 87023AKU.com$20,000pass 87024Sociology.com$40,000pass 87025SellGoldCoins.com$2,000SOLD$2,600$2,990.00 87026KFX.com$8,000pass 87027Marilyn.com$30,000pass 87028NL.com$385,000pass 87029ExecriseGloves.com$1,500SOLD$1,500$1,725.00 87030Keynesian.com$30,000pass 87031CakeMix.com$10,000pass 87032NumismaticsBlog.com$500pass 87033MutualFunds.com$1,000,000pass 87034GIU.com$6,500SOLD$6,500$7,475.00 87035BulkDiapers.comno reserveSOLD$500$575.00 87036Hemisphere.com$30,000SOLD$30,000$34,500.00 87037Alexandria.com$200,000pass 87038Downline.com$10,000pass 87039ActiveStocks.comno reserveSOLD$850$977.50 87040TheCoinBlog.comno reserveSOLD$325$373.75 87041Bicycle.com$200,000pass 87042HJR.com$9,300pass 87043FootballUniforms.com$18,000pass 87044Suit.com$95,000pass 87045OJQ.com$4,500pass 87046GradedCards.com$1,500SOLD$1,500$1,725.00 87047BasketballMemorabilia.com$1,500pass 87048VJZ.com$4,500pass 87049SmartTVs.com$5,000SOLD$5,500$6,325.00 87050GolfLessons.com$75,000pass 87051JazzBlog.comno reservepass 87052MyCoinCollection.com$500SOLD$600$690.00 87053Tie.com$100,000pass 87054UncutDiamonds.com$3,000pass 87055QR.com$200,000pass 87056NewTees.comno reserveSOLD$250$287.50 87057WOJ.com$6,500pass 87058FootballlEquipment.com$2,500pass 87059ItalianSuits.com$10,000pass 87060LuxuryBags.com$40,000pass 87061KCJ.com$9,300pass 87062SwissChronograph.com & SwissChronographs.comno reserveSOLD$550$632.50 87063PX.net$10,000pass 87064CurrencyExchange.com$220,000pass 87065DiveSuits.comno reserveSOLD$500$575.00 87066OpalEarrings.com$3,500pass 87067XZ.com$120,000SOLD$120,000$138,000.00 87068PHQ.com$3,500SOLD$4,500$5,175.00 !ERROR! E2 does not contain a number or expression!ERROR! F2 does not contain a number or expression Auction Total$419,970

 

Related posts:

Categories: News and Updates

Buenos Aires Airport closure leaves many ICANN 48 attendees stranded

Domain Name News - Fri, 2013-11-15 15:27

As the 48th ICANN meeting is set to start in Buenos Aires, many of the attendees were stranded today in Montevideo, Uruguay  and other South American airports due to an airport closure in Buenos Aires. An Austral Embraer ERJ-190 on behalf of Air Austral/Aerolineas Argentina coming from Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), overrun the runway and only came to a halt after the nose of the machine had hit the localizer antenna about 220 meters/730 feet past the runway end at 5:45 local time this morning (UTC-3). None of the 96 passengers was injured and they were all taken to the terminal. According to reporting of the airport there was a cold front passing through the area at the time. The airline reports that the incident occurred due to a sudden change in wind direction and speed.

Flights into the aiport resumed again after about three hours, but some attendees will now only arrive tomorrow. DNN was not able to confirm if any ICANN 48 attendees were on the flight itself.

 

[via AVHerald and the ICANN Social Group on Facebook, picture posted on twitter by @JuanMCornejo]

 

Related posts:

Categories: News and Updates

Demand Media to Spin Off Domain Registration Business into RightSide [Press Release]

Domain Name News - Tue, 2013-11-05 15:25

As already predicted by Andrew over at DNW:

Demand Media Announces Key Executives and Name for Proposed Domain Services Company

Company Will Lead Expansion of Generic Top Level Domains under Rightside Brand; Taryn Naidu Selected as Incoming CEO

November 05, 2013 09:00 AM Eastern Standard Time

SANTA MONICA, Calif.–()–Demand Media, Inc. (NYSE: DMD), a leading media and domain services company, today announced that Taryn Naidu, who currently serves as Demand Media’s Executive Vice President of Domain Services, will become the CEO and a Director of the newly formed domain services company that is proposed to be spun off from Demand Media. Demand Media also announced that it has selected the name Rightside Group, Ltd. (“Rightside”) for the spun off domain services business.

“It’s an exciting time for us, as new gTLDs start going live this year and our path to becoming an independent public company as a leader in our industry progresses.”

Rightside will be a Kirkland, WA based technology and services company for the Internet domain industry. The company will advance the way consumers and businesses define and present themselves online through a comprehensive technology platform making it possible to discover, register, develop, and monetize domain names. Rightside will play a leading role in the historic launch of new generic Top Level Domains, and the name represents a new way to navigate the Internet, while establishing the new company as the one to guide users in the right direction. It’s everything to the right of the dot – and beyond.

Taryn Naidu, who has led Demand Media’s domain services business since 2011 will become Chief Executive Officer of Rightside, upon completion of the separation. Additionally, Rightside executive management will include Wayne MacLaurin as Chief Technology Officer and Rick Danis as General Counsel. David Panos will be appointed as Chairman of the Board of Directors and Shawn Colo, Demand Media’s Interim President and Chief Executive Officer, will be appointed as a Director of Rightside in connection with the separation.

“Establishing the leadership team and brand identity of the proposed new company marks an important milestone in achieving our plan to separate our business into two distinct market leaders,” said Demand Media Interim President and Chief Executive Offer Shawn Colo. “I am pleased to announce a very strong executive team led by Taryn. This team has a wealth of industry experience, has played an integral role in building the largest wholesale domain registrar and is driving the transformation of this business into one of the largest end-to-end domain name service providers in the world.”

“Rightside’s mission will be to help millions of businesses and consumers define and present themselves online. We’re able to deliver on this through our distribution network of more than 20,000 active partners, one of the leading domain services technology platforms, a large number of applications for new generic Top Level Domains (gTLDs), and a deep bench of industry talent,” said Taryn Naidu, newly designated incoming Chief Executive Officer of Rightside. “It’s an exciting time for us, as new gTLDs start going live this year and our path to becoming an independent public company as a leader in our industry progresses.”

About Rightside

Rightside plans to inspire and deliver new possibilities for consumers and businesses to define and present themselves online. The company will be a leading provider of domain name services, offering one of the industry’s most comprehensive platforms for the discovery, registration, development, and monetization of domain names. This will include 15 million names under management, the most widely used domain name reseller platform, more than 20,000 distribution partners, an award-winning retail registrar, the leading domain name auction service and an interest in more than 100 new Top Level Domain applications. Rightside will be home to some of the most admired brands in the industry, including eNom, Name.com, United TLD and NameJet (in partnership with Web.com). Headquartered in Kirkland, WA, Rightside will have offices in North America and Europe. For more information please visit www.rightside.co.

About Demand Media

Demand Media, Inc. (NYSE: DMD) is a leading digital media and domain services company that informs and entertains one of the internet’s largest audiences, helps advertisers find innovative ways to engage with their customers and enables publishers, individuals and businesses to expand their online presence. Headquartered in Santa Monica, CA, Demand Media has offices in North America, South America and Europe. For more information about Demand Media, please visit www.demandmedia.com

Related posts:

Categories: News and Updates

Theme by Danetsoft and Danang Probo Sayekti inspired by Maksimer