News and Updates

Foggy Bottom's New Cyberspace Bureau "Lines of Effort": Dumb and Dumber

Domain industry news - Sat, 2018-02-10 16:17

The release of the Tillerson letter to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs describes the State Department's new "Cyber Bureau" together with its "primary lines of effort." The proposal is said to be designed to "lead high-level diplomatic engagements around the world." Two of those "efforts" deserve special note and provide an entirely new spin on the affectionate local term for the Department — Foggy Bottom.

While a few of the "efforts" are longstanding reasonable roles, most evince a new bilateral "America First" belligerence. Two deserve to be called "dumb and dumber." Perhaps they are best described in a hypothetical dialogue between a US high-level diplomat (call him Donald) and one from a foreign country (call him Vlad). [With apologies to SNL.]

Donald: I'm here today to tell you about two of our new Cyber Bureau dictates...I mean efforts.

Vlad: Please do tell.

Donald: The world must "maintain open and interoperable character [sic] of the Internet."

Vlad: Well said, Donald. Your foolish effort will greatly help our intelligence service penetrate American infrastructure and further manipulate elections! Will also help extend effort to other countries. It is better you spend money on huge wall. (wink, wink)

Donald: I have more. The Cyber Bureau also says that everyone must "facilitate the exercise of human rights, including freedom of speech and religion through the Internet."

Vlad: Well said again, Donald! Your effort will greatly assist comrade Assange, and his colleagues get all those WikiLeaks streamed out to the world. Our intelligence agents have more coming — including through their social media bots. After all, our intelligence agents have their rights too. (wink, wink) We can also get all of your Nazis to get their message out and disrupt your society. Hurray for internet freedom of speech.

Donald: Thank you Vlad for supporting our Cyber Bureau efforts.

Vlad: Your bilateral bullying efforts and isolation will greatly assist our diplomats in increasing our global stature. However, you have to be careful. You don't want to look like you are supporting Hillary's Internet Arab Spring strategy or ISIS getting their messaging out.

If there is intelligent life left in the U.S. Congress, it should remind Tillerson that for over a hundred years, American cyber diplomacy was based on a strategy of technology neutrality and not "politicizing" the focus on the common global interest in "facilitating peaceful relations, international cooperation among peoples and economic and social development by means of efficient telecommunication services." The text is the preamble of a treaty that every nation on Earth, including the U.S., has signed scores of times over the past 168 years. The strategy is also a pragmatic one because as the treaty text notes at the outset everyone "fully recogniz[es] the sovereign right of each State to regulate its telecommunication," and communications at borders can be stopped.

That long-standing strategy was abandoned twenty years ago when the Clinton Administration seized upon one particular technology platform — the DARPA academic research internet — and sought to evangelize it as the world's unfettered technology mandate. It was packaged as a utopian vision of happiness and economic wealth for all, while having a plethora of fatal flaws and disastrous potential effects with no effective mitigations. It should never have been allowed into the public infrastructure.

The Cyber Bureau mandate urgently needs to be re-written.

Written by Anthony Rutkowski, Principal, Netmagic Associates LLC

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More under: Internet Governance

Categories: News and Updates

Google is upping the ante on SSL

Domain Name Wire - Fri, 2018-02-09 14:48

“Not Secure” will show on sites even if people aren’t filling out a form field.

Google is upping the ante on SSL to nudge more websites toward moving to https://

Take a look at the graphic above. The top image currently shows in the address bar in Chrome for websites that use http:// (i.e., they don’t have an SSL certificate).

The second image currently shows on sites that don’t have SSL whenever someone enters information into a form field on the page.

Starting in July, the latest version of Chrome will show the second notification for sites that don’t have SSL even if someone is not inputting information into a form field.

I’m not sure how many people notice the “not secure” label. But my guess is the next step after this will be to make it more obvious, perhaps in a red color. So it probably makes sense to suck it up and upgrade to SSL now.

It would be nice if Google made this a little easier. Two things it could do are 1) create a one-click WordPress plugin to change to https once a certificate is installed and 2) make it so you don’t have to create a separate instance in Google Webmaster Central when you switch to https.


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Related posts:
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  2. SSL comes to landing page tools, but at a price
  3. Google adds more of its top level domains to HSTS preload list
Categories: News and Updates

Verisign results: Tax law implications and two topics that weren’t discussed

Domain Name Wire - Fri, 2018-02-09 14:13

Tax law will have big implications for Verisign.

Verisign (VRSN) reported fourth quarter and full year earnings after the bell yesterday.

Of note, the .com/.net base increased by 0.57 million domain names to 146.4 million. The company forecasted growth of 0.4 to 0.9 million for the quarter. For Q1, it forecasts 1.5 million to 2 million growth in the base.

Verisign has perfected its art of hitting at least the minimum growth prediction. It’s fairly easy for it to manipulate this with marketing dollars and specials across .com and .net to push registrations.

Because of the recent U.S. tax law changes, the company plans to repatriate $1.1 billion of cash that it has stashed in overseas subsidiaries. Despite having so much cash, the company has regularly borrowed money to buy back shares while keeping the cash safely offshore, outside the hands of the U.S. government.

It will now have to pay tax on money earned by these overseas entities because of the tax law changes. This will increase Verisign’s annual tax expense. Its interest deduction from borrowing money will also be limited. So the company is evaluating its entire capital structure.

It was the absence of discussion of a couple topics on yesterday’s conference call (and in recent quarters) that really struck me.

First, no one is asking about Verisign’s IDNs. It’s clear by now that those are a bust.

Second, all of that talk about monetizing intellectual property has disappeared. I suspect Verisign has decided to not ruffle feathers on IP and instead continue to work on ways to increase the price of .com domain names. Increasing prices slightly will have a bigger impact on its bottom line than a bit of IP wrangling.

Keep in mind that Verisign hired Phil Corwin last year. Corwin spent the last decade arguing against .com price increases on behalf of the Internet Commerce Association. Coincidence?


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Related posts:
  1. As .Com registrations surge, is Verisign a good buy?
  2. The .Com Cliff is .Coming
  3. .Com/.Net base grew by 1.47 million in Q3
Categories: News and Updates

The Internet Association Releases Letter Backing Senate Effort to Reinstate Net Neutrality Rules

Domain industry news - Fri, 2018-02-09 05:06

The Internet Association (IA) whose members include the likes of Google, Amazon and Facebook, on Thursday issued a letter addressed to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Minority Leader Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.) in support of the reinstatement of FCC rules. From the letter: "The FCC's recent Restoring Internet Freedom Order (the "Order") represents the complete reversal of broad, bipartisan consensus in the operation of the internet, and leaves consumers with no meaningful protections to ensure their access to the entire internet. The current Order should not stand, and IA supports all efforts — including comprehensive bipartisan legislation — to restore strong, enforceable net neutrality protections at the federal level. To that end, IA supports the Senate Congressional Review Act resolution to invalidate the Federal Communications Commission's January 4, 2018, Restoring Internet Freedom Order. While the CRA will help alleviate immediate concerns, the internet industry urges Congress to legislate a permanent solution."

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More under: Access Providers, Broadband, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation

Categories: News and Updates

ICANN Cancels .CORP, .HOME, and .MAIL TLDs Indefintley Due to Collision Concerns

Domain industry news - Fri, 2018-02-09 04:30

ICANN has announced that it has indefinitely deferred the delegations of the new TLDs .CORP, .HOME, and .MAIL due to the high-risk nature of the strings. The domains name system overseer has determined the said TLDs can cause name collisions, the overlap of private and public namespaces which may result in unintended and harmful results. "The introduction of any new domain name into the DNS at any level creates the potential for name collision [however] the New gTLD Program has brought renewed attention to this issue of queries for undelegated TLDs at the root level of the DNS because certain applied-for new TLD strings could be identical to name labels used in private networks." ICANN says the applicants of the TLDs will be refunded the full application fee of $185,000.

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The New State Department Cyberspace Bureau: from Multilateral Diplomacy to Bilateral Cyber-Bullying

Domain industry news - Thu, 2018-02-08 23:27

These days in Washington, even the most absurd proposals become the new normal. The announcement yesterday of a new U.S. State Department Cyberspace Bureau — with far-flung responsibilities and authority over anything relating to cybersecurity — is yet another example of setting the nation up as an isolated, belligerent actor on the world stage.

In some ways, the reorganization almost seems like a companion to last week's proposal to take over the nation's 5G infrastructure. Most disturbingly, it transforms U.S. diplomacy assets from multilateral cooperation to becoming the world's bilateral cyber-bully nation.

The State Department role has long had a very limited role in dealing with cybersecurity over the decades. The small substantive cybersecurity expertise resided in the century-old office devoted to evolving and implementing ITU treaties and occasionally facilitating major initiatives by other agencies and industry in expanding the means of international cooperation for new cyber technologies during periods of technology change. Notably, this included the U.S. assisting in 1988 in bringing about the world's existing cybersecurity instrument for datagram internets.

So what exactly is the Trump Administration proposing as the remit for the Bureau of Cyberspace and the Digital Economy?

  • Establish a global deterrence framework in which participating States make a political commitment to work together to impose consequences on States that engage in malicious cyber activities, based on participating States' shared understanding of what constitutes responsible State behavior in cyberspace.
  • Develop and execute key adversary specific strategies to impose costs and alter calculus of decision-makers
  • Advise and coordinate external responses to national-security-level cyber Incidents
  • Promote adoption of national processes and programs that enable foreign territorial cyber, threat detection, prevention, and response
  • Build foreign capacity to protect the global network thereby enabling like-minded participation in deterrence framework
  • Maintain open and interoperable character of the Internet with multi-stakeholder governance, instead of centralized government control
  • Promote an international regulatory environment for technology investments and the internet that benefits U.S. economic and national security interests
  • Promote cross-border flow of data and combat international initiatives which seek to impose restrictive localization or privacy requirements on U.S. businesses
  • Protect the integrity of U.S. and international telecommunications infrastructure from foreign-based threats. Serve as the USG interagency coordinator for international engagement.
  • Secure radio frequency spectrum for U.S. businesses and national security needs
  • Facilitate the exercise of human rights, including freedom of speech and religion through the internet
  • Build capacity of U.S. diplomatic officials to engage in these issues.

If you peek at the org chart, the office titles are equally alarming as the remit.

  • DAS for Cyberspace: Four Key Adversaries and Cyber Operations; Cyber Stability and Deterrence
  • PDAS: Strategic Planning & Capacity Building; Office of Technology & National Security; Global Challenges & Policy Coordination
  • DAS for Digital Economy: Global Networks & Radio Frequency Coordination; Data and Digital Regulatory Advocacy

Although a few of those responsibilities have long existed within the State Department, most are new. And, for those that have existed, State has deferred to the many other agencies with the substantive expertise to undertake the international cybersecurity activities — limiting the State role only to coordinating representation in a few specialized venues. The Tillerson reorganization is an assertion of claim over Washington international cybersecurity turf. However, the good news is that absent massively staffing up to replace the few people who have the slightest clue about the subject matter; there is no capacity to accomplish any of the remits.

The really dismaying aspect of this reorganization is that none of the functions or office designations speak to multilateral cooperation with other nations on common interests, but rather a messaging of bilateral belligerence, e.g., "Office of Four Key Adversaries and Cyber Operations" or "Cyber Stability and Deterrence." The functions and titles are aimed at cyberwar, not cyber diplomacy. It is an affront to the past hundred years during which the State Department staff and its extended community of agencies and industry participants have led the cyber initiatives in multilateral forums.

If the Administration really wants to cooperate globally toward increased cyber defense and infrastructure protection, it should consider abiding by the treaty instruments it has already signed for that purpose and cooperating with the other signatories in the venues it helped create.

What is proposed now is more suitable for a Bureau of Cyberwar. It is embarrassing for the nation, unlikely to further meaningful cybersecurity, and will encourage other nations to impose significant constraints and costs on U.S. business pursuing markets overseas.

Written by Anthony Rutkowski, Principal, Netmagic Associates LLC

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More under: Cybersecurity, Internet Governance, Policy & Regulation, Telecom

Categories: News and Updates

Lords of Uptime (Internet All-Star Rock Band) Replaces Manager for Alleged Allegiance to Rap!

DN Journal - Thu, 2018-02-08 22:28
NamesCon President Soeren von Varchmin leads a second life as a member of the Lords of Uptime rock band that just dismissed a manager found to favor rap!
Categories: News and Updates

That’s ‘Super’! Deal could make NamesCon auction ‘Great’

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 2018-02-08 16:45

Super.com sale would push auction over $2.5 million in sales.

The NamesCon extended auction ends today, and a big domain has met its reserve.

A bidder has met the reserve with a $1.2 million bid for Super.com. The bidder alias is evstratov, which does not bring up any results when I search for it plus NameJet on Google. A bid at this price requires bidder verification, and it’s possible we are looking at an end user here.

The big sale in the live auction was Great.com for $900,000, so superlatives are definitely in fashion.

The next highest domain to meet its reserve is KeyFobs.com for $6,000. There are a lot of high bids between KeyFobs.com and Super.com, but many of them are far off from their reserves.


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Related posts:
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  3. These domains have met their reserves for next week’s NamesCon auction
Categories: News and Updates

ICANN says no to .mail, .home and .corp, offers refund

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 2018-02-08 16:14

Domain system overseer gives final thumbs down to three top level domains.

ICANN’s board has passed a resolution confirming that it will not delegate the .mail, .home and .corp strings as part of 2012 round of new top level domain name expansion, and has authorized a full refund for companies that applied for these strings.

The strings were shelved due to concerns about name collisions. Lots of internal networks used these extensions, and setting them live in the DNS could cause issues.

While other strings also had issues of name collisions, they were not at the level of these three strings. All new top level domains had to institute mitigation periods to alert people who were using strings that are now top level domains. But that wouldn’t be enough for .home, .mail and .corp, the board has concluded.

The $185,000 refund will come as little consolation to some of the applicants. These are arguably some of the best strings. Also, one applicant invested heavily trying to game the system for .home…but I won’t feel too sorry for them.


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Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
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  3. What the new RAA means for YOU, the domain registrant
Categories: News and Updates

Bitcoin Domain Names Become Popular - and Attract Disputes

Domain industry news - Thu, 2018-02-08 15:00

Cryptocurrencies (such as Bitcoin) are all the rage — so, naturally, related domain name disputes are, too.

The wild fluctuations in cryptocurrency prices (Bitcoin hit a low of close to $6,000 this week, after reaching an all-time high of more than $19,000 only two months ago, and less than $1,000 a year ago) have attracted speculators, regulators and now even cybersquatters.

Bitcoin + Trademark Domain Names

About 16 cases involving domain names with the word "Bitcoin" have been filed as of this writing under the Uniform Domain Name Dispute Resolution Policy (UDRP). Each of the disputed domain names contains what appears to be a well-known trademark in addition to the word "Bitcoin," such as <morganstanleybitcoin.com>, <tdbankbitcoin.com>, and <capitalonebitcoin.com> (each of which was ordered transferred to the obvious trademark owner).

These multi-word cryptocurrency domain name disputes arose not because they contain "Bitcoin" but because they contain another entity's trademark. Indeed, it appears as if the word "Bitcoin" itself is not protected by any trademark registrations in the United States, although there are more than a dozen U.S. trademark registrations that include "Bitcoin," such as AMERICAN BITCOIN EXCHANGE (U.S. Reg. No. 4,665,053) and BITCOIN.GURU (U.S. Reg. No. 5,129,377).

So, it seems unlikely that anyone could successfully assert rights to a domain name based only on the word "Bitcoin," and the inclusion of another word may be essential to winning a UDRP dispute. For example, in a UDRP decision transferring the domain name <valium4bitcoins.com> to the drug company F. Hoffmann-La Roche, the panel wrote that the "dominant part of the disputed domain name" contained the trademark VALIUM and that the presence of the word "Bitcoin" in the domain name "does not affect the overall impression" of it.

And in a UDRP decision ordering transfer of three domain names including <bitcoincitadelinvestment.com>, the panel said that the word "Bitcoin" was simply a "generic financial term[]" that did not affect the UDRP's "confusingly similar" factor.

Interestingly, at least as of this writing, no UDRP complaints have been filed for domain names containing the names of some of Bitcoin's cryptocurrency competitors, such as Litecoin. That could simply be an indication of Bitcoin's dominance and, I suspect, is likely to change in the near future.

However, one company, Bittrex, which operates a cryptocurrency exchange, has been quite active in filing UDRP complaints for domain names that contain its BITTREX trademark, winning 23 decisions as of this writing, including for <bittrex.exchange>.

Why Cryptocurrency Domain Names?

Cybersquatters appear to be attracted to Bitcoin-related domain names at least in part to profit from questionable practices. For example, in the <valium4bitcoins.com> case, the panel wrote that the domain name "resolve[d] to a website offering generic products identical to Complainant's Valium products, and which are sold under Complainant's VALIUM trademark" — something the panel said created a likelihood of confusion and, therefore, bad faith under the UDRP's third element.

In the <morganstanleybitcoin.com> case (which also involved four other domain names), the panel applied the UDRP's "passive holding" doctrine to find bad faith even though the domain names were not associated with active websites. "Using a confusingly similar domain name that disrupts a complainant's business and trades upon the goodwill of a complainant shows bad faith..., even when a respondent does not actively use the domain names," the panel wrote.

Cybersquatters are not the only registrants of Bitcoin-related domain names, which also have attracted domainers interested in profiting from the fascination of cryptocurrency without treading on the rights of any trademark owners. Recently for example, one domain name blogger wrote that "cryptocurrency-related domain names have been big sellers."

If Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies continue to attract traders and media attention, I'm sure more related UDRP complaints are coming."

Written by Doug Isenberg, Attorney & Founder of The GigaLaw Firm

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More under: Blockchain, Domain Management, Domain Names, Law

Categories: News and Updates

Cryptocurrency Mining Attacks for the First Time Detected on Industrial Control Systems

Domain industry news - Thu, 2018-02-08 03:35

A water utility in Europe was compromised by cryptocurrency malware mining attack; the attack is the first public discovery of an unauthorized cryptocurrency miner impacting industrial controls systems. Sean Michael Kerner from eWeek reports: "At this point, Radiflow's investigation indicates that the cryptocurrency mining malware was likely downloaded from a malicious advertising site. As such, the theory ... is that an operator at the water utility was able to open a web browser and clicked on an advertising link that led the mining code being installed on the system. ... Cryptocurrency mining software does not steal data from a network, rather it consumes compute cycles. [T]he impact on the utility was degraded system performance, though given the size of the overall network and where the HMI systems connected, it might not have been a degradation that operators would have noticed on their own."

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Categories: News and Updates

EFF Founder John Perry Barlow Has Died

Domain industry news - Thu, 2018-02-08 02:24

Electronic Frontier Foundation founder John Perry Barlow, has died at the age of 70, according to a statement issued by the Foundation. "Barlow was a poet, essayist, Internet pioneer and prominent cyber-libertarian. He co-founded the Electronic Frontier Foundation in 1990 after realizing that the government was ill-equipped to understand what he called the 'legal, technical, and metaphorical nature of datacrime.' He said believed that "everyone's liberties would become at risk. Barlow described the founding of the EFF after receiving a visit from an FBI agent in April 1990 seeking to find out whether he was a member of 'a dread band of info-terrorists.' Shortly thereafter, Barlow and Mitch Kapor, the creator of Lotus 1-2-3, organized a series of dinners with leaders of the computer industry for discussions that would lead to the creation of the EFF."

"We are creating a world that all may enter without privilege or prejudice accorded by race, economic power, military force, or station of birth. We are creating a world where anyone, anywhere may express his or her beliefs, no matter how singular, without fear of being coerced into silence or conformity."
A Declaration of the Independence of Cyberspace by John Perry Barlow

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Categories: News and Updates

Another 6-Figure 3-Letter .Com Set the Pace on This Week's Sales Chart But All Groups Did Well

DN Journal - Thu, 2018-02-08 01:42
After being away for NamesCon last week we have a double dose of sales data for you this week and there is lots of good news.
Categories: News and Updates

Preparing for GDPR's Impact on WHOIS - 5 Steps to Consider

Domain industry news - Wed, 2018-02-07 19:55

With GDPR coming into effect this May, it is almost a forgone conclusion that WHOIS as we know it today, will change. Without knowing the full details, how can companies begin to prepare?

Communicate Changes – First and foremost, ensuring that brand protection, security and compliance departments are aware that a change to WHOIS access is on the horizon is an important first step. Just knowing that the ability to uncover domain ownership information is likely to change in the future will help to relieve some of the angst that is likely to occur.

Leverage Reverse WHOIS Now – Secondly, take advantage of Reverse WHOIS tools while the data they contain is still meaningful. Regardless of whether you use Reverse WHOIS to uncover rogue registrations, identify other infringing domains for UDRP filings, or for due diligence in support of mergers and acquisitions, run your searches now given that the quality of this data is likely to degrade over time.

Don't Delay - Take Action Against Infringing Domains – Take action now against infringing domains while access to ownership information is readily available. It's expected that in the future, brand owners and law enforcement will still be able to request contact information, but this could be a more onerous process. Will ICANN's new model allow for tiered access - at this point, we just don't know.

Understand Changes to Online Brand Protection Solutions – For those companies that have online brand protection solutions in place, begin working with your providers to understand what impact they are expecting, and how they are planning to support changes to WHOIS.

Stay Informed – With ICANN poised to introduce an interim WHOIS model, companies can stay informed by visiting icann.org/dataprotectionprivacy. Given the short timelines, it's expected that ICANN's interim model will be released shortly.

Undoubtedly, there are still so many unknowns regarding the impact of GDPR on WHOIS — but preparing now can help to relieve some of pressure likely to be caused by the changes to its format.

Written by Elisa Cooper, SVP Marketing and Policy at Brandsight, Inc.

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More under: Domain Management, DNS, Domain Names, ICANN, Internet Governance, Policy & Regulation, Privacy, Whois

Categories: News and Updates

Amazon opens .Bot up to more bots

Domain Name Wire - Wed, 2018-02-07 18:09

Company adds three eligible bot platforms for .bot domain names.

Amazon.com has added several bots to its approved list of chatbots for .bot domain name registrants.

Now, people who have published bots based on Howdy’s Botkit Studio, Gupshup and Pandorabots can register a domain name ending in .bot. This is in addition to Amazon Lex, Google Dialogflow and Microsoft Bot Framework, which were allowed when the domain launched in early December.

Registrants start the process at amazonregistry.com/bot and have to verify that they’ve published a bot on one of these platforms in order to complete the registration.

So far about 1,300 names .bot domains have been registered. Almost all of them are registered through EnCirca. EnCirca is a small registrar known for working with registries that have complex domain registration requirements.

The limited registration phase for .bot runs through March 30.


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Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
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Categories: News and Updates

16 end user domain name sales including a $130,000 cryptocurrency buyer

Domain Name Wire - Wed, 2018-02-07 15:38

A cryptocurrency exchange, packaging company and RealNetworks bought domain names.

What domain names are end users buying?

Take a look at the 16 domain names below, all of which were recently sold and are owned by end users. The first

If you find this informative, you can view previous lists like this here.

Sedo sales

HPX.com $130,000 – This was a huge upgrade for crytocurrency service Hypex, which uses the domain name Hypex.io

Tougher.com $12,230 – This is a clever brand for a women’s workwear maker–Tough Her. ToughHer.com with two ‘h’s is parked.

RMHD.com $10,000 – RealNetworks (NASDAQ: RNWK) bought this domain name for its RealMedia HD products.

ThreePoints.com $8,000 – Any guesses about why Grupo Planeta, a publishing company, bought this domain name?

OrionX.com $7,900 – OrionX is a cryptocurrency exchange.

SwissPack.com €5,500 – SwissPack is a packaging company in Canada.

DreamCraft.com $5,000 – DreamCraft is a game developer.

DotHub.com $4,950 – The terms and conditions for this site that is still under development refer to a company called Subtree Inc, but it’s not clear what the site will offer.

HMHOlding.com $3,500 – HM Holding Limited in Hong Kong uses the domain name HMholding.com.hk.

Secovia.com $3,000 – German firm secova GmbH & Co. KG uses the domain name Secova.de. This is either a translation or a typo.

EasyCarWash.com €2,250 – Car wash manufacturing company Washtec Holding GmbH.

Sellingadvantage.com $2,750 – Progressive Business Publications is the publisher of The Selling Advantage.

Cyoss.com €3,000 – IT company ESG Elektroniksystem- und Logistik GmbH has a division called Cyoss.

Glo.ca $2,750 – Imperial Tobacco Canada Limited has some sort of eCigarette with this name.

PerfectName sales

idb.us $2,850 – IDB Bank, which uses the domain IDBNY.com.

loris.com $4,973 – The company that uses Loris.ai.


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Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. End users buy matching domains and domain hacks
  2. List of end user domain name sales up to $50,000
  3. This week’s end user domain name sales
Categories: News and Updates

10 interesting NameJet sales from January 2018

Domain Name Wire - Tue, 2018-02-06 21:25

Ten notable sales including an end user purchase on NameJet.com.

NameJet has released sales data from last month, which excludes the NameJet auction held in Las Vegas last week. It was a fairly slow month with 103 domains selling for over $2,000 that totaled $459,000.

Here are ten sales that caught my attention.

These.com $15,000 – Visually it’s a great brand, but I wonder if you tell someone to check out “these.com” if they’ll give you a funny look.

CloudPass.com $12,500 – This was a true drop and an end user purchase. The buyer is CloudPass Limited.

ZSV.com $11,100 – This is a pretty bad three-letter domain, so I’d look at this price as a floor for three-letter domain names. Note that zsv.net ($530) and zsv.org ($427) have also sold on NameJet in the past couple years.

CryptoICOs.com $8,255 – Right now any crypto domain that goes through an auction cycle is getting lots of attention. Will the hard crash affect this?

Bloated.com $4,999 – Seems like the perfect domain for a drug company.

CardMember.com $4,655 – A common term in the credit card business. I get lots of robocalls from scam “Card member services”…it’s a game of whack-a-mole.

Mammoth.net $4,400 – That’s a mammoth price, but this domain was registered in 1996.

StreetMaps.com $3,000 – A pretty good deal, although the terms used to refer to street maps might be changing.

SpeedRead.com $2,935 – Fantastic domain name to offer speed reading courses.

Bandwidth.net $2,588 – One of those domains in which .net makes a lot of sense.


© DomainNameWire.com 2017. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. What domain names to buy this week
  2. NameJet sellers at center of shill bidding questions
  3. Here’s what NameJet is doing about shill bidding
Categories: News and Updates

Top 5 Domain Name stories from January

Domain Name Wire - Tue, 2018-02-06 14:55

A GoDaddy test, Home.loans and Whois were featured in popular stories last month.

I had a great time finishing out January at NamesCon last week. The conference is a great way to kick off the year.

As I do every month, here’s a look back at the top posts on Domain Name Wire from the last month.

1. This GoDaddy Premium Domain change could help you sell a lot more domains – GoDaddy is testing a new way to display premium domain names to customers. Hopefully, it will increase sales.

2. Entrepreneur pays $500,000 to acquire Home.loans domain name – It’s a record-setting price for a new TLD, at least that has been publicly reported. You can listen to an interview with the buyer in DNW Podcast #171.

3. GoDaddy to start masking some Whois data through Port 43 – The registrar made the move to cut down on spam, but some data researchers are not pleased.

4. Short seller targets Tucows with scathing report – A report from an anonymous group that previously attacked Web.com caused Tucows’ stock to drop. There are good reasons to question the report.

5. Epik takes Whois search counts to another level – The company helps you determine who is looking at Whois records for your domain names.

And if you missed any podcasts, listen now or download them on your favorite podcast app:

171 – Meet the man who spent $500k on Home.loans
170 – How to avoid UDRP – John Berryhill
169 – WordPress.com and domain names – Kellie Peterson
168 – Domain business rewind
167 – The Internet of Things


© DomainNameWire.com 2017. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com.

Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
  1. Silicon Alley Insider Values GoDaddy at $1.4 Billion, Oversee.net at $1 Billion
  2. 128 “binder” domains registered at GoDaddy.com after debate
  3. GoDaddy officially launches second-line phone service
Categories: News and Updates

New Jersey Becomes Latest State to Implement Its Own Net Neutrality Rules

Domain industry news - Tue, 2018-02-06 01:41

New Jersey on Monday became the latest state to implement its own net neutrality rules following the FCC's Repeal, Harper Neidig reports in The Hill today. "While New Jersey cannot unilaterally regulate net neutrality back into law or cement it as a state regulation, we can exercise our power as a consumer to make our preferences known," says Gov. Phil Murphy. New Jersey is the latest state to follow the lead of his counterparts in New York and Montana, who are pushing back on the FCC order. "Gurbir Grewal, New Jersey's attorney general, also announced on Monday that the state would be the 22nd to join a lawsuit against the FCC."

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More under: Access Providers, Broadband, Net Neutrality, Policy & Regulation

Categories: News and Updates

Gold Dragon Helps Olympics Malware Attacks Gain Permanent Presence on Systems, Reports McAfee

Domain industry news - Mon, 2018-02-05 21:38

A report recently released by McAfee Advanced Threat Research (ATR) revealed a fileless attack targeting organizations involved with the Pyeongchang Olympics. It was known that the attack used a PowerShell implant to establish a channel to the attacker's server in order to gather basic system-level data. However what was not determined at that time was what occurred after the attacker gained access to the victim's system. Ryan Sherstobitoff and Jessica Saavedra-Morales from McAfee report: "[We] now discovered additional implants that are part of an operation to gain persistence for continued data exfiltration and for targeted access. We have named these implants, which appeared in December 2017, Gold Dragon, Brave Prince, Ghost419, and Running Rat, based on phrases in their code. ... We now believe this implant is the second-stage payload in the Olympics attack that ATR discovered January 6, 2018. The PowerShell implant [Gold Dragon] used in the Olympics campaign was a stager based on the PowerShell Empire framework that created an encrypted channel to the attacker's server."

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More under: Cyberattack, Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Malware

Categories: News and Updates

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