News and Updates

Going Global with Rolf Larsen – DNW Podcast #209

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 2018-11-05 16:30

Rolf Larsen’s journey from ISP to top level domain registry…and beyond.

Rolf Larsen was a pioneer in bringing the internet to Norway when he ran successful ISP and hosting companies. Now he runs the .Global top level domain and is rolling out Registry Office, a management system for domain registries. Learn how he raised money for .Global and his experience running the domain, plus much more on today’s episode.

Also: Gab.com, stolen domains, Google Domains and Adsense.

Note: I recorded this podcast before the Verisign news broke Thursday evening, so that will be a topic on the next podcast. Also, Gab.com has moved again.

Subscribe via iTunes to listen to the Domain Name Wire podcast on your iPhone or iPad, view on Google Play Music, or click play above or download to begin listening. (Listen to previous podcasts here.)

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

Rob Monster explains why he accepted GAB.com domain at Epik

Domain Name Wire - Mon, 2018-11-05 14:45

Controversial site moves its domain name to Epik.

Rob Monster, CEO of Epik, believes in “Digital Sovereignty.”

Most domain name registrars don’t like a hot potato, but Epik founder Rob Monster has decided to serve as the registrar for one–Gab.com.

If you aren’t familiar with the site, the “free speech” social network has been in the news because the Pittsburgh synagogue shooter ranted on the site.

The domain was at GoDaddy, which asked Gab.com founder Andrew Torba to move the domain elsewhere after the shooting. The domain moved to Uniregistry before finding a home at Epik.

I’m not surprised that Epik CEO Rob Monster accepted the domain transfer. Monster often uses terms like “digital sovereignty” and promotes decentralization. Epik has promoted itself as “The Swiss Bank of Domains”.

In a blog post this weekend, Monster wrote that “De-Platforming is Digital Censorship. Blacklisting is Digital Shunning.”

He wrote:

As the news broke, and as some elements in the mainstream media rendered their judgement, I embarked on my own search for truth. Along the way, I did have an opportunity to meet with the Founder of Gab, Andrew Torba, an entrepreneur who was willing to swim against the tide for what he believes is right, namely empowering netizens to discuss openly about matters of mutual interest with limited risk of censorship.

Although, I did not take the decision lightly to accept this domain registration, I look forward to partnering with a young, and once brash, CEO who is courageously doing something that looks useful. As I reflect on my own journey as a truth-seeking tech entrepreneur, I have no doubt that Andrew will continue to develop not only as tech entrepreneur but also as a responsible steward — one that can balance bravado with diplomacy and who tempers courage with humility.

I’m curious if other registrants of controversial sites will move to Epik as a result of this decision. Many of these sites cost more to be the registrar of than the $10 or so they pay each year. They come with headaches. But those are apparently headaches Monster is willing to handle in furtherance of his beliefs.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

Holy sh!t…Verisign just called out “Domain Scalpers” and its biggest customers

Domain Name Wire - Fri, 2018-11-02 18:05

Verisign says its biggest customers are engaged in a questionable practice of reselling domain names.

Fresh off a win with the U.S. government that will let it increase prices on .com domain names, Verisign (NASDAQ: VRSN) has dissed its biggest customers: domain investors.

In a blog post today, Verisign calls people who buy domains to sell for higher prices “domain scalpers” and says they are the ones to blame, not Verisign.

Among the companies it calls out are Turn Commerce and GoDaddy, who are supporters of Internet Commerce Association. Verisign writes:

Flipping domain names or warehousing them to create scarcity adds nothing to the industry and merely allows those engaged in this questionable practice to enrich themselves at the expense of consumers and businesses.

Yet it’s these very companies–especially Turn Commerce–that Verisign can give credit to for keeping its domain registrations growing. It’s domain investors in China that gave the company a big boost. It’s companies like Turn Commerce that have bought millions of domains that have padded Verisign’s bottom line.

Verisign has been catering to this market for years. Sponsoring its conferences, promoting domain investing, creating the very tools designed to let domain investors know which domains to register…and now it wants to pretend it has nothing to do with this “questionable practice”. C’mon.

I’m flummoxed by Verisign’s decision to post this. I mean, it just won. I can understand the company publishing this if Verisign was trying to move the discussion, but not that it got want it wants, why would it bash its biggest customers?

I’m dumbfounded.

 

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

Related posts:
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Categories: News and Updates

How Much Could Businesses and Consumers Save if .com Price Cap Benefits Were Passed On to Consumers?

Domain industry news - Fri, 2018-11-02 17:43

Hint: It's at least $1 billion every year.

Recently, a blogger whose website features posts and ads from domain speculators wondered what the cost of registering a .com domain name would be if somebody else ran the .com registry. But this blog post asks the more relevant question: "How much could businesses and consumers save if the benefit of .com price caps were passed along to consumers?"

Now is a good time to focus on this question, since Verisign and the US Department of Commerce just amended their Cooperative Agreement to allow limited, regulated .com price increases.

After reading this post, ask yourself if you believe that consumers are getting the benefit of those price controls.

First, for those not fully familiar with the generic domain name ecosystem and the .com price controls that exist today, here is a quick primer:

  • Domain registry operators are the global wholesale source of a particular top-level domain (TLD), such as .com. But, .com is the only ICANN-contracted TLD where wholesale prices are as tightly controlled (a $7.85 price cap has been in place since 2012).
  • The only entities that Verisign can supply .com domain names to are ICANN-accredited registrars. To be clear: Verisign, as a registry, is prohibited from selling .com domain names directly to end users, or to anyone other than ICANN-accredited registrars (ICANN manages the domain name system).
  • ICANN-accredited registrars (such as GoDaddy, the largest) are the retailers of domain names to businesses and individuals and set the prices that businesses and consumers pay — without regulation or restriction.

The wholesale cost that registrars pay for .com domain names is limited by the price regulation described above. However, the price caps don't help businesses and consumers who buy from registrars, since registrars can charge retail prices for .com domain names as high as the market will bear. Many registrars sell .com domain names at reasonable mark-ups directly to businesses and consumers. Other registrars sell the first year of a domain name registration below their wholesale cost, and then raise prices on renewal registrations in the following years. This is the ICANN-managed domain name ecosystem most know.

But there is also an unregulated secondary market — led by domain speculators — hiding in plain sight. There, some speculators buy domain names at regulated low prices, then sell them at a far higher price. This secondary market is as old as the domain name system itself. However, since the wholesale price cap was imposed on .com in 2012, the secondary market has expanded in ways that exploit consumers.

Look at the website HugeDomains.com — owned by registrar TurnCommerce — where nearly four million .com domain names are warehoused and offered for sale:

  • None are offered below $195, and 90 percent of their names are priced above $1,000.
  • The average price is roughly $2,500 per domain — a markup of more than thirty thousand percent (30,000%) over the regulated wholesale price of $7.85.
    • That's a profit margin of over 99 percent on each sale
    • At these prices, the value of the HugeDomains' inventory is nearly $10 billion
  • Many of HugeDomains' names have incredibly high price tags. Here are a few examples from their website, as of November 1, 2018:
    • NeighborhoodWatch.com for $1.25 million
    • Margin.com is $3.5 million
    • Glossary.com is offered at $7.5 million
    • Even the fluff in their inventory isn't cheap — Fluff.com is listed at $325,000

And yet, TurnCommerce has been actively lobbying our government to freeze the wholesale price of .com domain names. When they can buy .com names at capped wholesale prices, and mark them up to $2,500, $50,000, $1 million, or even $7 million, does anyone believe they are lobbying for continued price caps in order to protect consumers?

Even traditional registrars like GoDaddy have become big players in the secondary market and hold large portfolios of domain names for resale. GoDaddy's public filings show it has spent over $100 million buying domain names for resale purposes. GoDaddy holds these domain names and then offers them to consumers and small businesses at prices that are often thousands of times the wholesale price. There's nothing in GoDaddy's public filings about its profits from this practice, but GoDaddy claims its domain name portfolio is worth $2.5 billion.

TurnCommerce and GoDaddy are not the only ones profiting from .com price caps. Domain speculation, or "domain scalping," as some call it, has become a highly profitable industry unto itself. In fact, one of the top domain name speculators in this market reports a net worth of $500 million. These speculators even have their own lobbying group, the Internet Commerce Association (ICA), where TurnCommerce and GoDaddy are members via their subsidiaries NameBright and Afternic.

Ironically, in this speculators' market, the price control on .com domain names serves only to reduce the cost of domain names bought by these speculators. Domain speculator Frank Schilling stated that the .com price cap "...has given the [domain speculation] industry a shot in the arm," in a Jan. 2017 podcast interview. Flipping domain names or warehousing them to create scarcity adds nothing to the industry and merely allows those engaged in this questionable practice to enrich themselves at the expense of consumers and businesses.

So how large is this market? The answer may shock you. Verisign estimates that over $1 billion in annual secondary-market sales of .com domain names can be documented through publicly available data. Several domain speculators believe the size of the total market is $2-3 billion a year. Perhaps $1.5 billion is closer to the actual number, which is about equal to the total annual pre-tax domain name revenue of all ICANN registry services providers combined, including Verisign.

Recently, some who profit most from the unregulated secondary domain market have been lobbying our government to freeze .com wholesale prices. They say their goal is to protect small businesses and consumers. But their business models and domain resale prices show that their real goal is to preserve the profits they earn from .com price caps. In fact, the real opportunity for consumer savings would come from reducing or eliminating the more than $1 billion per year in scalping fees that businesses and consumers pay today.

The bottom line is this: Since our government continues to regulate .com prices, then we should make sure that price regulation actually benefits consumers, instead of contributing over a billion dollars to domain speculators every year.

How can we ensure that the intended benefits of the .com price caps actually accrue to consumers? Stay tuned — that question will be tackled in my next blog post, where I'll explore this question with industry experts. You'll be surprised at how simple and effective some of the answers will be.

Written by Jeannie McPherson, Product Management Director, Social Media and Mobile, Verisign

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More under: Domain Names, ICANN

Categories: News and Updates

Who wins, who loses from Trump Admin decision on domain names

Domain Name Wire - Fri, 2018-11-02 16:37

Verisign is the big winner as consumers face higher bills for .com domain names.

David Redl, who leads the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, gave Verisign a windfall. It’s not clear what he got in return.

The U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA) has extended the Cooperative Agreement between it and Verisign (NASDAQ: VRSN). This agreement governs how Verisign is able to operate .com, which has a contract with ICANN to run.

The biggest element of the agreement is pricing. Previously, the agreement froze the wholesale price that Verisign could charge for .com domains. The new agreement still has pricing restrictions but allows for 7% price hikes in four out of every six years. Actual pricing must be negotiated with ICANN.

Those 7% price increases mean the price registrars pay for a .com could increase up to 31% every six years. They pass these costs on to their customers.

I’m still struggling to understand what NTIA chief David Redl got from Verisign in return for these price increases. The NTIA release states that Verisign has agreed to “operate the .com registry in a content neutral manner”, which might be a pat on the back to Ted Cruz, who was upset about the NTIA giving up a key contract to ICANN that gave it some theoretical additional control over the internet. But nothing changes here; Verisign has always run .com in a content-neutral manner.

Here’s who wins and who loses from the agreement:

Big Winner: Verisign – This is the most obvious. Nearly all of Verisign’s business is maintaining its monopoly contract to run .com. Every cent it raises prices drops directly to the bottom line. I have to hand it to Verisign; this deal will be a boon for investors. They have a contract to run .com that’s already well above market prices, and they will likely get to increase prices even further. Its stock is up 18% today.

Winner: Other Registries -When Verisign increases .com prices, it makes other TLDs seem more appealing. Other domains can be priced lower, and even those that are priced higher will be able to justify their prices to the marketplace.

Winner: ICANN – ICANN wants more cash in the bank, and what better way to do this than to renegotiate its contract with Verisign. ICANN will grant Verisign price increases in return for Verisign giving a bigger kickback to ICANN’s coffers.

Winner: Phil Corwin – The outspoken critic of Verisign laid out excellent reasons Verisign shouldn’t be able to increase .com prices when he worked for an advocacy group that represents domain owners. Then Verisign hired him, silencing a key critic. Think he gets a bonus?

Depends: Domain Registrars -This might seem counterintuitive, but some domain registrars stand to benefit from the wholesale price increases. Whenever Verisign has increased fees in the past, these registrars have used it as an excuse to raise their prices and blame someone else. History tells us that they tend to hike their prices more than the 7% that’s being assessed to them.

Other registrars will be hurt, especially ones that offer low-cost services or have customers with large domain portfolios. GoDaddy will be one of the hardest hit. It’s looking at millions of dollars a year in extra fees based on its portfolio alone, plus passing along fee hikes to all of its customers.

Big Losers: Consumers – Consumers will pay more for their .com domains. A very small business that has one or two domains won’t feel the sting, but in aggregate there will be a large hit to SMBs. Larger corporations, domain investors, and businesses that rely on lots of domains to make their business hum will directly feel the pain.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

Verisign stock skyrockets on new contract terms

Domain Name Wire - Fri, 2018-11-02 15:20

Stock up 18% after U.S. government grants pricing windfall.

Shares in Verisign (NASDAQ: VRSN) are trading sharply higher today after the company signed a new agreement with the U.S. Government for .Com.

That Verisign would continue to run .com was never in doubt, but the Department of Commerce also agreed to let Verisign increase the price of .com domain names substantially.

Verisign shares are up about $25 to $166, up 18%. Shares topped $175 earlier in the day.

.Com price hikes are not guaranteed, as Verisign still needs to negotiate them with ICANN, the group that oversees the internet’s naming system. However, ICANN is likely to grant price hikes in return for larger fees paid from Verisign to ICANN.

They are certainly toasting in Reston, Virginia this morning.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

Radix Registry's .ONLINE Hits the 1 Million Domains Mark to Become One of the 5 Biggest New gTLDs

DN Journal - Fri, 2018-11-02 15:15
.ONLINE passed a major milestone today when the new gTLD from Radix Registry saw its 1 millionth domain name registered. That makes it the 5th biggest new gTLD.
Categories: News and Updates

U.S. Government Extends Its Cooperative Agreement With Verisign, Green Lights .Com Price Increase

Domain industry news - Thu, 2018-11-01 22:00

NTIA released a statement today announcing the agreement reached to extend and modify Verisign's Cooperative Agreement. "These modifications are in line with policy priorities of the Trump Administration," reads the official statement. It further states: "The changes create a new commitment to content neutrality in the Domain Name System (DNS), provide market-based pricing flexibility, and reduce the regulatory burden on Verisign. ... The amendment repeals Obama-era price controls and provides Verisign the pricing flexibility to change its .com Registry Agreement with ICANN to increase wholesale .com prices. Specifically, the flexibility permits Verisign to pursue with ICANN an up to 7 percent increase in the prices for .com domain names, in each of the last four years of the six-year term of the .com Registry Agreement. The changes also affirm that Verisign may not vertically integrate or operate as a registrar in the .com top-level domain."

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Categories: News and Updates

US Senator Wyden Proposes Bill That Could Jail Executives Over Repeated Data Privacy Violations

Domain industry news - Thu, 2018-11-01 21:35

U.S. Democratic Senator Ron Wyden released an early draft of a bill today that would subject company CEOs and senior executives to tough penalties including 10 to 20 years of imprisonment for failing to protect consumer data. Colin Lecher reporting in The Verge: "Wyden's draft proposal, called the Consumer Data Protection Act, would give the FTC more authority and resources to police the use of data by adding a total of 175 new staff. Under the proposal, the FTC would also be allowed to fine companies up to 4 percent of revenue for a first offense."

In summary, the bill empowers the Federal Trade Commission to:

  1. Establish minimum privacy and cybersecurity standards.
  2. Issue steep fines (up to 4% of annual revenue), on the first offense for companies and 10-20 year criminal penalties for senior executives.
  3. Create a national Do Not Track system that lets consumers stop third-party companies from tracking them on the web by sharing data, selling data, or targeting advertisements based on their personal information. It permits companies to charge consumers who want to use their products and services, but don't want their information monetized.
  4. Give consumers a way to review what personal information a company has about them, learn with whom it has been shared or sold, and to challenge inaccuracies in it.
  5. Hire 175 more staff to police the largely unregulated market for private data.
  6. Require companies to assess the algorithms that process consumer data to examine their impact on accuracy, fairness, bias, discrimination, privacy, and security.

The big picture: "If voters flip the House or, less likely, the Senate on Tuesday [US midterm election], it could supercharge the debate over privacy," says David McCable of Axios. "Lawmakers are trying to get federal legislation in place before California’s new rules go into effect in 2020."

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More under: Internet Governance, Law, Policy & Regulation, Privacy, Web

Categories: News and Updates

Breaking: U.S. Gov Grants Verisign .Com Price Hikes

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 2018-11-01 20:37

Major .com price hikes could be coming.

The U.S. Government has extended its Cooperative Agreement with Verisign (NASDAQ: VRSN) for managing the .com domain name. The deal will allow Verisign to negotiate with ICANN to raise the price of .com by 7% in each of the last four years of each six-year .com contract.

Verisign released this statement:

Amendment 35 provides Verisign the pricing flexibility to change its . com Registry Agreement with ICANN to increase wholesale price for . com domain names. Specifically, the flexibility permits Verisign to pursue with ICANN an up to 7% percent increase in the price for . com domain names, in each of the last four years of each six-year period of the . com Registry Agreement. Amendment 35 clarifies that the vertical integration restrictions on Verisign’s ability to own an ICANN-accredited registrar apply only to the . com registry and not to other services offered by Verisign, and the .com Registry Agreement can be amended to reflect that. Amendment 35 also identifies the circumstances that require approval by the DOC for further changes to the .com Registry Agreement, extends the expiration of the Cooperative Agreement to November 30, 2024, and provides for the automatic renewal of the Cooperative Agreement for six-year terms unless the DOC provides Verisign with written notice of non-renewal 120 days prior to the end of the then-current term. Finally, Amendment 35 confirms that Verisign will operate the . com registry in a content neutral manner with a commitment to participate in ICANN processes.

In the amendment, the U.S. Department of Commerce stated that ccTLDs, new gTLDs and social media “have created a more dynamic DNS marketplace”, and as such, it’s appropriate for Verisign to have pricing flexibility.

Price hikes can’t begin for two years from now. Verisign will still have to get ICANN’s approval for any price hikes, but ICANN has previously acquiesced. ICANN is likely to grant price hikes in return for a higher cut of the action.

The full amendment is here (pdf).

The Department of Commerce billed the changes as reducing regulatory burdens in line with Trump’s policies, and took a stab at the Obama Administration for freezing .com prices:

NTIA and Verisign have agreed to extend and modify the Cooperative Agreement. These modifications are in line with policy priorities of the Trump Administration. The changes create a new commitment to content neutrality in the Domain Name System (DNS), provide market-based pricing flexibility, and reduce the regulatory burden on Verisign.

Amendment 35 confirms that Verisign will operate the .com registry in a content neutral manner with a commitment to participate in ICANN processes. To that end, NTIA looks forward to working with Verisign and other ICANN stakeholders in the coming year on trusted notifier programs to provide transparency and accountability in the .com top level domain.

The amendment repeals Obama-era price controls and provides Verisign the pricing flexibility to change its .com Registry Agreement with ICANN to increase wholesale .com prices. Specifically, the flexibility permits Verisign to pursue with ICANN an up to 7 percent increase in the prices for .com domain names, in each of the last four years of the six-year term of the .com Registry Agreement. The changes also affirm that Verisign may not vertically integrate or operate as a registrar in the .com top level domain.

This story has been updated with additional details.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

Guta.com Launches New Quarterly Report on Premium Domain Sales in China

DN Journal - Thu, 2018-11-01 20:26
Guta.com, a brokerage that has bridged the Western and Chinese domain markets, has launched a new report that breaks down trends at the high end of the market.
Categories: News and Updates

Talking .New on This Week in Google

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 2018-11-01 18:16

I had a short cameo on TWiG yesterday to discuss .New.

I had an unexpected cameo on This Week in Google yesterday to talk about how Google is using the .New top level domain.

If you missed it, Google has created shortcuts using the .new domain that create documents within Google’s apps. For example, type doc.new and it will open a new Google Doc.

This video is set to start playing at the moment I discussed this on the show yesterday:

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

Berners-Lee Warns About the Danger of Concentration Regarding Growing Dominance of Tech Giants

Domain industry news - Thu, 2018-11-01 17:47

World Wide Web founder Tim Berners-Lee speaking during an interview this week, warned Silicon Valley technology giants have grown so dominant they may need to be broken up. Berners-Lee told Reuters: "What naturally happens is you end up with one company dominating the field so through history there is no alternative to really coming in and breaking things up. There is a danger of concentration. ... Before breaking them up, we should see whether they are not just disrupted by a small player beating them out of the market, but by the market shifting, by the interest going somewhere else."

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More under: Internet Governance, Policy & Regulation, Privacy, Web

Categories: News and Updates

.Com winners and losers, and Google Domains’ odd practice

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 2018-11-01 16:01

You still can’t register a domain for more than one year at Google Domains.

ICANN has published the latest official data from Verisign (NASDAQ:VRSN) about the .com registry. This registrar-by-registrar report covers July 2018.

While reviewing the data I was surprised to see something about Google Domains. Even after all of these years and the growing success of its registrar, Google Domains still doesn’t allow initial registrations for more than one year. You can renew domains for multiple years at a time, but all initial registrations are limited to one year.

Registrars love multi-year registrations, so I’m baffled why Google Domains doesn’t offer them.

Anyhow, on to the rankings. Here’s how registrars did in terms of new .com registrations:

1. GoDaddy.com* (NYSE: GDDY) 916,032 (866,819 in June)
2. HiChina Zhicheng Technology Ltd. 237,296 (203,536)
3. Tucows** (NASDAQ:TCX) 212,279 (192,056)
4. Xin Net Technology Corporation 129,492 (132,636)
5. Endurance+ (NASDAQ: EIGI) 127,916 (117,369)
6. NameSilo 127,451 (105,228)
7. NameCheap Inc. 124,011 (117,964)
8. Web.com++ 93,535 (96,339)
9. Google Inc. 94,033 (89,914)
10. West.cn 59,781 (not in top 10)

Here’s the leaderboard of the top registrars in terms of total .com registrations as of the end of July 2018:

1. GoDaddy* 48,659,723 (48,452,314 in June)
2. Tucows** 12,834,441 (12,835,741)
3. Endurance+ 7,411,874 (7,500,686)
4. Web.com++ 6,721,550 (6,737,824)
5. HiChina 5,683,428 (5,527,250)
6. Namecheap 4,312,430 (4,284,760)
7. 1&1 3716477 (3,731,057)
8. Xin Net Technology Corporation 2,260,541 (2,172,780)
9. GMO 2,011,266 (2,035,462)
10. Google 1,840,869 (1,782,920)

Many domain companies have multiple accreditations and I’ve tried to capture the largest ones. See the notes below.

* Includes GoDaddy and Wild West Domains
** Includes Tucows and Enom
+ Includes PDR, Domain.com, FastDomain and Bigrock. There are other Endurance registrars, but these are the biggest.
++ Includes Network Solutions and Register.com

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

End user domain sales led by a .Space domain name

Domain Name Wire - Thu, 2018-11-01 14:09

A UK training provider, a travel site for Equatorial Guinea and a cryptocurrency bought domain names last week.

GDPR has made it more difficult to uncover end user domain name sales. But searching for sold domains that already resolve, as well as using what’s left of Whois, helps uncover some of them.

This week’s top sales at Sedo include some interesting end-user prospects. The top .com sale, Kiaro.com could be used for a an inkjet label printer. Also, take a look at Air.Space, which set a record for the highest publicly-reported .space sale to date according to Namebio…by a long shot. Sedo tells me the domain sold through the SedoMLS Channel.

Here are some of the end user sales at Sedo this past week, and you can view previous weeks’ lists here.

Air.Space $17,500 – This is in development with the title “Make friends around live 3D entertainment.” Will it be some sort of AR/VR social network?

Kiaro.com $15,000 – The top .com sale of the week has a private Whois record. When you Google this term the main thing that comes up is a label printer called Kiaro.

TapTax.com $5,000 – This domain is still in escrow. However, TAP stands for Taxpayer Access Point. It could also be for general tax filing software with “tap” referring to tapping a screen or app.

AAL.co.uk £4,250 – The new site for Apprentice Assessments Limited, a private training provider in the UK.

P-Care.com €3,900 – This Whois record changed to Schaefges Brothers, Inc. out of Wheeling, Illinois who handle Pool and Aquatic Complex construction projects. It’s now in the name of a web design company. P-Care would make sense for a pool company.

4k.de €3,100 – Forwards to 4kfilme.de or “4k movies”, 4k is an Ultra HD standard. This German site features news about 4k/UHD, movies, Hi-Fi and audio technologies and trends. A great purchase of a shorter 2-character domain name in this popular ccTLD.

GuineaEcuatorial.com €2,600 – Resolving to a site in Spanish for Equatorial Guinea, a Central African country.

An-Deiner-Seite.de €2,500 – Purchased by the Germany Marketing Communications firm ΛMΛRCOM. This could be for one of their clients for an upcoming campaign, An-Deiner-Seite translates to “by your side”.

BitcoinDiamond.org $2,500 – The domain forwards to btcd.io, a website for a cryptocurrency called Bitcoin Diamond.

Run365.com $2,500 – When you Google the name of the registrant, you see lots of photos of him running marathons. So like the name suggests, this will be a site about running.

TheZoo.org $2,000 – Forwards to WhosWhointheZoo.com, a novelty gift site based in Canada.

 

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  1. What domain names Mozilla and others bought last week
  2. What domain names Goldman Sachs and others bought this week
  3. More end user domain name sales
Categories: News and Updates

Dave Evanson's Latest 6-Figure Sale at Sedo Tops This Week's Domain Sales Chart

DN Journal - Thu, 2018-11-01 01:32
A 6-figure .com and one of the year's 10 biggest ccTLD sales to date are the headliners on DNJournal's latest weekly sales report.
Categories: News and Updates

Internet Watch Foundation Uses Hashes to Block Child Abuse Material

Domain industry news - Wed, 2018-10-31 17:18

Last week during the ICANN meeting in Barcelona I attended a short presentation from the Internet Watch Foundation (IWF).

Their mission is pretty simple:

...eliminate child sexual abuse imagery online (source)

Fortunately, the presentation I was at did not include any of the actual material (which would have been illegal anyway) but even without seeing any of it the topic is one that I think most people find deeply disturbing.

You can dig into some of the data on their interactive annual report, which includes some truly disturbing numbers including the one that I find most disturbing:

2% involve children aged 2 or under.

One of the tools they've made available to 3rd parties is a system which recognises images based on a hash. Here's a video they've created to explain how it works:

Several content networks are using this and similar technologies to help keep their platforms free of this kind of content.

If you come across CSAM (Child sexual abuse material) then you should report it to your local hotline. The Irish one is here, while the international organisation that co-ordinates hotlines is here.

Written by Michele Neylon, MD of Blacknight Solutions

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More under: Internet Governance, Law, Policy & Regulation, Web

Categories: News and Updates

Gab.com is apparently on a payment plan. That should serve as a warning.

Domain Name Wire - Wed, 2018-10-31 13:27

Domain name appears to be on a payment plan at Escrow.com.

The valuable domain name Gab.com is in limbo. It is used for a ‘free speech’ social network and it seems that the Pittsburgh synagogue shooter was radicalized (in part) by using the service.

GoDaddy told the company to move its domain name elsewhere. A new Whois record shows that the owners transferred Gab.com to Uniregistry in the Cayman Islands. The Hot Potato is now in Frank Schilling’s hands.

But there’s something else notable on the Whois record for Gab.com. In order to transfer it, GoDaddy’s proxy service had to be removed. Note the address and email address in the public Whois:

That’s the address for Escrow.com and the email address used when a domain name is sold in a payment plan.

In other words, it looks like the $220,000 sale on Flippa wasn’t paid up front.

The domain is damaged now that it has been used for a controversial purpose. If Gab.com stops making payments on the domain (which is possible given that their payment processors and hosts have pulled the plug), it might be harder to sell the domain again.

Whenever you lease a domain or sell it on a payment plan, you need to set terms on how it can be used. While typical clauses prevent using it for spam or adult content, you might want to look further than that.

© DomainNameWire.com 2018. This is copyrighted content. Domain Name Wire full-text RSS feeds are made available for personal use only, and may not be published on any site without permission. If you see this message on a website, contact copyright (at) domainnamewire.com. Latest domain news at DNW.com: Domain Name Wire.

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Categories: News and Updates

Weekend Cyberattack on Pakistani bank reported to be a Historic $6 Million Loss, Bank Denies Claim

Domain industry news - Tue, 2018-10-30 21:43

Karachi-based Bank Islami revealed Saturday morning that it had detected abnormal transactions resulting in 2.6 million Pakistani rupees, roughly $19,500 and precautionary steps where taken immediately. But ZDNet reports anonymous sources have indicated that the bank may know more than it's letting up. "The anonymous source's information was confirmed by a statement issued by the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP), the country's central banking entity and regulator, in an advisory to its own clients and fellow banks. ... Bank Islami may be in denial because if the bank is proven to have acted too late in stopping the attack, it is on the hook for the $6 million alleged funds..."

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More under: Cyberattack, Cybercrime

Categories: News and Updates

US Copyright Office Expands Security Researchers' Ability to Hack Without Going to Jail

Domain industry news - Tue, 2018-10-30 20:52

The Librarian of Congress and US Copyright Office has updated the Digital Millennium Copyright Act extending some essential exemptions ensuring that computer security researchers won't be treated like nefarious criminals for their contributions to society. Karl Bode reporting in Motherboard writes: "We've long noted how security researchers are frequently treated like criminals by companies that don't appreciate having security flaws and vulnerabilities in their products exposed or discussed. That's often not helped by the vague language of the DMCA, which critics argue has been an overreaching mess with near-endless potential for collateral damage." Some caveats: According to Blake Reid, Associate Clinical Professor at Colorado Law, new ruling only applies to "use exemptions," not "tools exemptions" and security researchers still can't release things like pen-testing tools that bypass DRM, or even publish technical papers.

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More under: Cybercrime, Cybersecurity, Law, Policy & Regulation

Categories: News and Updates

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